Archive for the ‘Conferences’ Category

Balisage Papers Due in 3 Weeks!

Thursday, March 16th, 2017

Apologies for the sudden lack of posting but I have been working on a rather large data set with XQuery and checking forwards and backwards to make sure it can be replicated. (I hate “it works on my computer.”)

Anyway, Tommie Usdin dropped an email bomb today with a reminder that Balisage papers are due on April 7, 2017.

From her email:

Submissions to “Balisage: The Markup Conference” and pre-conference symposium:
“Up-Translation and Up-Transformation: Tasks, Challenges, and Solutions”
are on April 7.

It is time to start writing!

Balisage: The Markup Conference 2017
August 1 — 4, 2017, Rockville, MD (a suburb of Washington, DC)
July 31, 2017 — Symposium Up-Translation and Up-Transformation
https://www.balisage.net/

Balisage: where serious markup practitioners and theoreticians meet every August. We solicit papers on any aspect of markup and its uses; topics include but are not limited to:

• Web application development with XML
• Informal data models and consensus-based vocabularies
• Integration of XML with other technologies (e.g., content management, XSLT, XQuery)
• Performance issues in parsing, XML database retrieval, or XSLT processing
• Development of angle-bracket-free user interfaces for non-technical users
• Semistructured data and full text search
• Deployment of XML systems for enterprise data
• Web application development with XML
• Design and implementation of XML vocabularies
• Case studies of the use of XML for publishing, interchange, or archiving
• Alternatives to XML
• the role(s) of XML in the application lifecycle
• the role(s) of vocabularies in XML environments

Detailed Call for Participation: http://balisage.net/Call4Participation.html
About Balisage: http://balisage.net/Call4Participation.html

pre-conference symposium:
Up-Translation and Up-Transformation: Tasks, Challenges, and Solutions
Chair: Evan Owens, Cenveo
https://www.balisage.net/UpTransform/index.html

Increasing the granularity and/or specificity of markup is an important task in many content and information workflows. Markup transformations might involve tasks such as high-level structuring, detailed component structuring, or enhancing information by matching or linking to external vocabularies or data. Enhancing markup presents secondary challenges including lack of structure of the inputs or inconsistency of input data down to the level of spelling, punctuation, and vocabulary. Source data for up-translation may be XML, word processing documents, plain text, scanned & OCRed text, or databases; transformation goals may be content suitable for page makeup, search, or repurposing, in XML, JSON, or any other markup language.

The range of approaches to up-transformation is as varied as the variety of specifics of the input and required outputs. Solutions may combine automated processing with human review or could be 100% software implementations. With the potential for requirements to evolve over time, tools may have to be actively maintained and enhanced. This is the place to discuss goals, challenges, solutions, and workflows for significant XML enhancements, including approaches, tools, and techniques that may potentially be used for a variety of other tasks.

For more information: info@balisage.net or +1 301 315 9631

I’m planning on posting tomorrow one way or the other!

While you wait for that, get to work on your Balisage paper!

Up-Translation and Up-Transformation … [Balisage Rocks!]

Sunday, January 29th, 2017

Up-Translation and Up-Transformation: Tasks, Challenges, and Solutions (a Balisage pre-conference symposium)

When & Where:

Monday July 31, 2017
CAMBRiA Hotel, Rockville, MD USA

Chair: Evan Owens, Cenveo

You need more details than that?

Ok, from the webpage:

Increasing the granularity and/or specificity of markup is an important task in many different content and information workflows. Markup transformations might involve tasks such as high-level structuring, detailed component structuring, or enhancing information by matching or linking to external vocabularies or data. Enhancing markup presents numerous secondary challenges including lack of structure of the inputs or inconsistency of input data down to the level of spelling, punctuation, and vocabulary. Source data for up-translation may be XML, word processing documents, plain text, scanned & OCRed text, or databases; transformation goals may be content suitable for page makeup, search, or repurposing, in XML, JSON, or any other markup language.

The range of approaches to up-transformation is as varied as the variety of specifics of the input and required outputs. Solutions may combine automated processing with human review or could be 100% software implementations. With the potential for requirements to evolve over time, tools may have to be actively maintained and enhanced.

The presentations in this pre-conference symposium will include goals, challenges, solutions, and workflows for significant XML enhancements, including approaches, tools, and techniques that may potentially be used for a variety of other tasks. The symposium will be of value not only to those facing up-translation and transformation but also to general XML practitioners seeking to get the most out of their data.

If I didn’t know better, up-translation and up-transformation sound suspiciously like conferred properties of topic maps fame.

Well, modulo that conferred properties could be predicated on explicit subject identity and not hidden in the personal knowledge of the author.

There are two categories of up-translation and up-transformation:

  1. Ones that preserve jobs like spaghetti Cobol code, and
  2. Ones that support easy long term maintenance.

While writing your paper for the pre-conference, which category fits yours the best?

4 Days Left – Submission Alert – XML Prague

Sunday, December 11th, 2016

A tweet by Jirka Kosek reminded me there are only 4 days left for XML Prague submissions!

  • December 15th – End of CFP (full paper or extended abstract)
  • January 8th – Notification of acceptance/rejection of paper to authors
  • January 29th – Final paper

From the call for papers:

XML Prague 2017 now welcomes submissions for presentations on the following topics:

  • Markup and the Extensible Web – HTML5, XHTML, Web Components, JSON and XML sharing the common space
  • Semantic visions and the reality – micro-formats, semantic data in business, linked data
  • Publishing for the 21th century – publishing toolchains, eBooks, EPUB, DITA, DocBook, CSS for print, …
  • XML databases and Big Data – XML storage, indexing, query languages, …
  • State of the XML Union – updates on specs, the XML community news, …

All proposals will be submitted for review by a peer review panel made up of the XML Prague Program Committee. Submissions will be chosen based on interest, applicability, technical merit, and technical correctness.

Accepted papers will be included in published conference proceedings.

I don’t travel but if you need a last-minute co-author or proofer, you know where to find me!

Clojure/conj 2016 – Videos – Sorted

Monday, December 5th, 2016

Clojure/conf 2016 has posted videos of all presentations (thanks!) to YouTube, which displays them in no particular order.

To help with my viewing and perhaps yours, here are the videos in title order:

  1. Adventures in Understanding Documents – Scott Tuddenham
  2. Audyx.com 40k locs to build the first web – based sonogram – Asher Coren
  3. Barliman: trying the halting problem backwards, blindfolded – William Byrd, Greg Rosenblatt
  4. Becoming Omniscient with Sayid – Bill Piel
  5. Building a powerful Double Entry Accounting system – Lucas Cavalcanti
  6. Building composable abstractions – Eric Normand
  7. Charting the English Language…in pure Clojure – Alexander Mann
  8. Clarifying Rules Engines with Clara Rules – Mike Rodriguez
  9. Clojure at DataStax: The Long Road From Python to Clojure – Nick Bailey
  10. A Clojure DSL for defining CI/CD orchestrations at scale – Rohit Kumar, Viraj Purang
  11. Composing music with clojure.spec – Wojciech Franke
  12. In situ model-based learning in PAMELA – Paul Robertson, Tom Marble
  13. Juggling Patterns and Programs – Steve Miner
  14. Overcoming the Challenges of Mentoring – Kim Crayton
  15. A Peek Inside SAT Solvers – Jon Smock
  16. Powderkeg: teaching Clojure to Spark – Igor Ges, Christophe Grand
  17. Production Rules on Databases – Paula Gearon
  18. Programming What Cannot Be Programmed: Aesthetics and Narrative – D. Schmüdde
  19. Proto REPL, a New Clojure Development and Visualization Tool – Jason Gilman
  20. Simplifying ETL with Clojure and Datomic – Stuart Halloway
  21. Spec-ulation Keynote – Rich Hickey
  22. Spectrum, a library for statically "typing" clojure.spec – Allen Rohner
  23. Using Clojure with C APIs for crypto and more – lvh
  24. WormBase database migration to Datomic on AWS: A case Study – Adam Wright

Enjoy!

XML Prague 2017, February 9-11, 2017 – Registration Opens!

Wednesday, November 16th, 2016

XML Prague 2017, February 9-11, 2017

I mentioned XML Prague 2017 last month and now, after the election of Donald Trump as president of the United States, registration for the conference opens!

Coincidence?

Maybe. 😉

Even if you are returning to the U.S. after the conference, XML Prague will be a welcome respite from the tempest of news coverage of what isn’t known about the impending Trump administration.

At 120 Euros for three days, this is a great investment both professionally and emotionally.

Enjoy!

XML Prague 2017 is coming

Sunday, October 16th, 2016

XML Prague 2017 is coming by Jirka Kosek.

From the post:

I’m happy to announce that call for papers for XML Prague 2017 is finally open. We are looking forward for your interesting submissions related to XML. We have switched from CMT to EasyChair for managing submission process – we hope that new system will have less quirks for users then previous one.

We are sorry for slightly delayed start than in past years. But we have to setup new non-profit organization for running the conference and sometimes we felt like characters from Kafka’s Der Process during this process.

We are now working hard on redesigning and opening of registration. Process should be more smooth then in the past.

But these are just implementation details. XML Prague will be again three day gathering of XML geeks, users, vendors, … which we all are used to enjoy each year. I’m looking forward to meet you in Prague in February.

Conference: February 9-11, 2016.

Important Dates:

Important Dates:

  • December 15th – End of CFP (full paper or extended abstract)
  • January 8th – Notification of acceptance/rejection of paper to authors
  • January 29th – Final paper

You can see videos of last year’s presentation (to gauge the competition): Watch videos from XML Prague 2016 on Youtube channel.

December the 15th will be here sooner than you think!

Think of it as a welcome distraction from the barn yard posturing that is U.S. election politics this year!

ApacheCon – Seville, Spain – Week of November 14th, 2016

Monday, July 18th, 2016

You have relied on Apache software, read its documentation, contributed (flamed?) on its lists. Attend ApacheCon and meet other members of the Apache community, in full bandwidth, real time.

The call for papers (CFP) for this event is now open, and will remain open until September 9th.

The event is divided into two parts, each with its own CFP. The first part of the event, called Apache Big Data, focuses on Big Data projects and related technologies.

Website: http://events.linuxfoundation.org/events/apache-big-data-europe

CFP: http://events.linuxfoundation.org/events/apache-big-data-europe/program/cfp

The second part, called ApacheCon Europe, focuses on the Apache Software Foundation as a whole, covering all projects, community issues, governance, and so on.

Website: http://events.linuxfoundation.org/events/apachecon-europe

CFP: http://events.linuxfoundation.org/events/apachecon-europe/program/cfp

ApacheCon is the official conference of the Apache Software Foundation, and is the best place to meet members of your project and other ASF projects, and strengthen your project’s community.

If your organization is interested in sponsoring ApacheCon, contact Rich Bowen at evp@apache.org. ApacheCon is a great place to find the brightest developers in the world, and experts on a huge range of technologies.

I lifted this text from an email by missywarnkin@yahoo.com.

Enjoy!

The Feynman Technique – Contest for Balisage 2016?

Tuesday, June 28th, 2016

The Best Way to Learn Anything: The Feynman Technique by Shane Parrish.

From the post:

There are four simple steps to the Feynman Technique, which I’ll explain below:

  1. Choose a Concept
  2. Teach it to a Toddler
  3. Identify Gaps and Go Back to The Source Material
  4. Review and Simplify

This made me think of the late-breaking Balisage 2016 papers posted by Tommie Usdin in email:

  • Saxon-JS – XSLT 3.0 in the Browser, by Debbie Lockett and Michael Kay, Saxonica
  • A MicroXPath for MicroXML (AKA A New, Simpler Way of Looking at XML Data Content), by Uche Ogbuji, Zepheira
  • A catalog of Functional programming idioms in XQuery 3.1, James Fuller, MarkLogic

New contest for Balisage?

Pick a concept from a Balisage 2016 presentation and you have sixty (60) seconds to explain it to Balisage attendees.

What do you think?

Remember, you can’t play if you don’t attend! Register today!

If Tommie agrees, the winner gets me to record a voice mail greeting for their phone! 😉

Balisage 2016 Program Posted! (Newcomers Welcome!)

Monday, May 23rd, 2016

Tommie Usdin wrote today to say:

Balisage: The Markup Conference
2016 Program Now Available
http://www.balisage.net/2016/Program.html

Balisage: where serious markup practitioners and theoreticians meet every August.

The 2016 program includes papers discussing reducing ambiguity in linked-open-data annotations, the visualization of XSLT execution patterns, automatic recognition of grant- and funding-related information in scientific papers, construction of an interactive interface to assist cybersecurity analysts, rules for graceful extension and customization of standard vocabularies, case studies of agile schema development, a report on XML encoding of subtitles for video, an extension of XPath to file systems, handling soft hyphens in historical texts, an automated validity checker for formatted pages, one no-angle-brackets editing interface for scholars of German family names and another for scholars of Roman legal history, and a survey of non-XML markup such as Markdown.

XML In, Web Out: A one-day Symposium on the sub rosa XML that powers an increasing number of websites will be held on Monday, August 1. http://balisage.net/XML-In-Web-Out/

If you are interested in open information, reusable documents, and vendor and application independence, then you need descriptive markup, and Balisage is the conference you should attend. Balisage brings together document architects, librarians, archivists, computer
scientists, XML practitioners, XSLT and XQuery programmers, implementers of XSLT and XQuery engines and other markup-related software, Topic-Map enthusiasts, semantic-Web evangelists, standards developers, academics, industrial researchers, government and NGO staff, industrial developers, practitioners, consultants, and the world’s greatest concentration of markup theorists. Some participants are busy designing replacements for XML while other still use SGML (and know why they do).

Discussion is open, candid, and unashamedly technical.

Balisage 2016 Program: http://www.balisage.net/2016/Program.html

Symposium Program: http://balisage.net/XML-In-Web-Out/symposiumProgram.html

Even if you don’t eat RELAX grammars at snack time, put Balisage on your conference schedule. Even if a bit scruffy looking, the long time participants like new document/information problems or new ways of looking at old ones. Not to mention they, on occasion, learn something from newcomers as well.

It is a unique opportunity to meet the people who engineered the tools and specs that you use day to day.

Be forewarned that most of them have difficulty agreeing what controversial terms mean, like “document,” but that to one side, they are a good a crew as you are likely to meet.

Enjoy!

Before There Was Big Data … There Was XLDB!

Wednesday, May 18th, 2016

9th Extremely Large Databases Conference

Online registration closes 19 May 2016!

May 24-26, 2016

Program

Rumor has it that some sponsorships are still available.

Hard to imagine but check with xldb-admin@slac.stanford.edu if you want to be associated with the premier extreme scale event of the year.

Clojure/west 2016 – Videos! [+ Unix Sort Trick]

Monday, April 18th, 2016

I started seeing references to Clojure/west 2016 videos and to marginally increase your access to them, I have sorted them by author and with a Unix sort trick, by title.

Unix Sort Trick (truthfully, just a new switch to me)

Having the videos in author order is useful but other people may remember a title and not the author.

I want to sort the already created <li> elements with sort, but you can see the obvious problem.

By default, sort uses the entire line for sorting, which given the urls, isn’t going to give the order I want.

To the rescue, the -k switch for sort, which allows you to define which field and character offset in that field to use for sorting.

In this case, I used 1, the default field and then character offset 74, the first character following the > of the <a> element.

Resulted in:

In full: sort -k 1.74 sort-file.txt > sorted-file.txt

Wrestling With Inclusion at LambdaConf [Why Wrestle? Just Do It.]

Friday, March 25th, 2016

Wrestling With Inclusion at LambdaConf by John A De Goes.

From the post:

Last year, StrangeLoop rescinded an invitation to a speaker because of the controversy that erupted (nay, exploded) when his talk was announced.

The controversy had nothing to do with the talk, which by all accounts was a great fit for the eclectic topics served up every year by the conference. Rather, the controversy surrounded the speaker’s political views, which were penned under a pseudonym years prior.

I learned about all this quite recently, and for a very unexpected reason: the same speaker submitted a talk to LambdaConf.

The gender- and person-anonymized talk was endorsed by the review committee, and made it all the way onto the schedule board before a volunteer brought the issue to our attention.

My immediate reaction could be described as a combination of shock and horror. No conference organizer ever wants to face a controversial hailstorm like this!

Far, far too long to read, unless you are interested in an example of public justification taken to its extreme.

Not that I disagree with the decision to include the speaker.

I do disagree that any speaker should be singled out for the sort of vetting that is described in John’s post.

All speakers should be accorded the presumption that they will obey local laws and not attempt to physically harm other conference attendees and will obey any code of conduct for the conference.

Absent evidence to the contrary. Evidence as reports, confirmed by news accounts and/or police reports of attacks at prior conferences or violation of other conference codes of conduct.

If a speaker endangers other attendees and/or violates conference rules of conduct, then don’t allow them to return. But don’t mimic the worse aspects of the developing police state in the United States and attempt to anticipate someone violating a norm of conduct.

Anticipatory regulation of possible future conduct is unfair to the person in question.

Not to mention being a distraction from advancing the subject of your conference.

As John’s post so ably demonstrates.

Imagine the useful articles, posts, code that could have been written with all that effort and strain.

Subject to documented prior arrests for violence against other attendees and/or violation of rules of conduct, modulo declarations to do the same, be inclusive.

What more need be said?

PS: Some people will disagree with that position but they can occupy their own digital space and time with un-responded to comments and diatribes. The right to speak does not imply an obligation to listen.

Logan CIJ Symposium 2016 – Speaker Contacts

Monday, March 21st, 2016

For some reason, conference organizers appear to abhor gathering speaker contact information to a common location. Or in such a way that it could be quickly re-purposed, say for creating a twitter list of those speakers.

The Logan CIJ Syposium 2016 was no different.

But, rather than complain to the conference organizers, I have collated the contact information (if any), for each speaker:

Some had weblinks only, while others only had Twitter accounts.

William Binney, Bernd Fix, John Goetz, Seymour Hersh, Caroline Nevejan, Ana Naomi de Sousa, and Christina Varvia had no contact information listed at all.

I started to ferret that out but then decided perhaps it wasn’t listed for a good reason.

Two requests:

First, pass this list along to others interested in journalism, news and reporting.

Second, point out to conference organizers that presenting author/presenter contact information in a re-usable format benefits everyone in their community.

Re-usable author/presenter contact information in a single location should be the default, not the exceptional case.

27 Reasons to Attend Clojure/West 2016 + Twitter List

Wednesday, February 17th, 2016

Clojure/West 2016 Speakers

I extracted the speaker list plus twitter accounts where available from the speakers list for Clojure/West 2016.

Now you have twenty-seven reasons to attend! Stack those up against any to not attend.

Register: April 15th-16th, Seattle Marriott Waterfront

April 15th is “tax day” in the United States.

Wouldn’t you rather be having fun with Clojure than grubbing around with smudged and/or lost receipts? I thought so. Register today!

Whether the government picks you pocket one day or the next makes little difference.

File early and attend while the tax hounds try to decide if Thai numerals printed in Braille are a legitimate tax return. 😉

  1. Matthias Felleisen Types are like the Weather, Type Systems are like Weathermen
  2. Alex Kehayias Functional Game Engine Design for the Web
  3. Allison Carter, From Fluxus to Functional: A Journey Through Interactive Art
  4. Amie Kuttruff, Deepen and Diversify the Clojure Community with Jr Engineers
  5. Aysylu Greenberg, (+ Loom (years 2))
  6. Bryce Covert, USE lisp WITH game – Making an Adventure Game with Clojure
  7. Christopher Small, Datalog all the way down
  8. Claire Alvis, Creating DSLs – a tale of spec-tacular success and failure
  9. Daniel Higginbotham, Parallel Programming, Fork/Join, and Reducers
  10. Devon Peticolas, One Million Clicks per Minute with Kafka and Clojure
  11. Donevan Dolby, Managing one of the world’s largest Clojure code bases
  12. Gerred Dillon, ClojureScript and Lambda: A Case Study
  13. Ghadi Shayban, Parsing Text with a Virtual Machine
  14. Jack Dubie, Fast full stack testing in om.next
  15. Jonathan Boston, Caleb Phillips, Building a Legal Data Service with Clojure
  16. Katherine Fellows, Anna Pawlicka, ClojureBridge in Practice
  17. Mario Aquino, The Age of Talkies
  18. Michael Drogalis, Inside Onyx
  19. Michał Marczyk, defrecord/deftype in Clojure and ClojureScript
  20. Mikaela Patella, Web Development is Distributed Systems Programming
  21. Nathan Marz, Specter: powerful and simple data structure manipulation
  22. Nathan Sorenson, Hybrid Automata and the Continuous Life
  23. Patrick O’Brien, Braid Chat: Reifying Online Group Conversations
  24. Paula Gearon, Production Rules in Datomic
  25. Peter Schuck Hash Maps: more room at the bottom
  26. Priyatam Mudivarti, Caching half a billion user transactions
  27. Stuart Sierra, The Joys and Perils of Interactive Development

PS: Be careful how you use the term “weathermen.” The professionally paranoid in government remember a different meaning that what you may intend. As do some of the rest of us.

Balisage 2016, 2–5 August 2016 [XML That Makes A Difference!]

Tuesday, February 2nd, 2016

Call for Participation

Dates:

  • 25 March 2016 — Peer review applications due
  • 22 April 2016 — Paper submissions due
  • 21 May 2016 — Speakers notified
  • 10 June 2016 — Late-breaking News submissions due
  • 16 June 2016 — Late-breaking News speakers notified
  • 8 July 2016 — Final papers due from presenters of peer reviewed papers
  • 8 July 2016 — Short paper or slide summary due from presenters of late-breaking news
  • 1 August 2016 — Pre-conference Symposium
  • 2–5 August 2016 — Balisage: The Markup Conference

From the call:

Balisage is the premier conference on the theory, practice, design, development, and application of markup. We solicit papers on any aspect of markup and its uses; topics include but are not limited to:

  • Web application development with XML
  • Informal data models and consensus-based vocabularies
  • Integration of XML with other technologies (e.g., content management, XSLT, XQuery)
  • Performance issues in parsing, XML database retrieval, or XSLT processing
  • Development of angle-bracket-free user interfaces for non-technical users
  • Semistructured data and full text search
  • Deployment of XML systems for enterprise data
  • Web application development with XML
  • Design and implementation of XML vocabularies
  • Case studies of the use of XML for publishing, interchange, or archiving
  • Alternatives to XML
  • the role(s) of XML in the application lifecycle
  • the role(s) of vocabularies in XML environments

Full papers should be submitted by the deadline given below. All papers are peer-reviewed — we pride ourselves that you will seldom get a more thorough, skeptical, or helpful review than the one provided by Balisage reviewers.

Whether in theory or practice, let’s make Balisage 2016 the one people speak of in hushed tones at future markup and information conferences.

Useful semantics continues to flounder about, cf. Vice-President Biden’s interest in “one cancer research language.” Easy enough to say. How hard could it be?

Documents are commonly thought of and processed as if from BOM to EOF is the definition of a document. Much to our impoverishment.

Silo dissing has gotten popular. What if we could have our silos and eat them too?

Let’s set our sights on a Balisage 2016 where non-technicals come away saying “I want that!”

Have your first drafts done well before the end of February, 2016!

Best Paper Awards in Computer Science (2014)

Friday, November 27th, 2015

Best Paper Awards in Computer Science (2014)

From the webpage:

Jeff Huang’s list of the best paper awards from 29 CS conferences since 1996 up to and including 2014.

I saw a tweet about Jeff’s site being updated to include papers from 2014.

If you are looking for reading material in a particular field, this is a good place to start.

For a complete list of the organizations, conferences as expanded abbreviations: see: Best Paper Awards in Computer Science (2013). None of them have changed so I didn’t see the point of repeating them.

Conference Videos for the Holidays

Wednesday, November 18th, 2015

As you know, I saw Alexander Songe’s CRDT: Datatype for the Apocalypse presentation earlier today.

With holidays approaching next week, November 23rd-27th, 2015 in the United States, I thought some of you may need additional high quality video references.

Clojure TV

Elixir Conf 2014.

Elixir Conf 2015

Erlang Solutions

FunctionalTV

LuceneSolrRevolution

No slight intended for any conference videos I didn’t list. I will list different conference videos for the next holiday list, which will appear in December 2015.

Enjoy!

PS: I have to apologize for the poor curating of videos by their hosts. With only a little more effort, these videos could be a valuable day to day resource.

VIS’15 Recap with Robert Kosara and Johanna Fulda (DS #63)

Friday, November 13th, 2015

VIS’15 Recap with Robert Kosara and Johanna Fulda (DS #63)

data-story-podcast

And that’s not the entire agenda for the podcast!

So say nothing of the fourteen links to papers, videos and pre-views that follow the podcast agenda.

A recap of the 2015 IEEE Visualization Conference (VIS) (25 Oct – 30 Oct 2015).

If you missed the conference or just want a great weekend activity, consider the podcast and related resources.

Wrangler Conference 2015

Friday, November 13th, 2015

Wrangler Conference 2015

Videos!

Given the panel nature of some of the presentatons, ordering these videos by speaker would not be terribly useful.

However, I have exposed the names of the participants in a single list of all the videos.

Enjoy!

XML Prague 2016 – Call for Papers [Looking for a co-author?]

Tuesday, November 3rd, 2015

XML Prague 2016 – Call for Papers

Important Dates:

  • November 30th – End of CFP (full paper or extended abstract)
  • January 4th – Notification of acceptance/rejection of paper to authors
  • January 25th – Final paper
  • February 11-13, XML Prague 2016

From the webpage:

XML Prague 2016 now welcomes submissions for presentations on the following topics:

  • Markup and the Extensible Web – HTML5, XHTML, Web Components, JSON and XML sharing the common space
  • Semantic visions and the reality – micro-formats, semantic data in business, linked data
  • Publishing for the 21th century – publishing toolchains, eBooks, EPUB, DITA, DocBook, CSS for print, …
  • XML databases and Big Data – XML storage, indexing, query languages, …
  • State of the XML Union – updates on specs, the XML community news, …

All proposals will be submitted for review by a peer review panel made up of the XML Prague Program Committee. Submissions will be chosen based on interest, applicability, technical merit, and technical correctness.

Accepted papers will be included in published conference proceedings.

Authors should strive to contain original material and belong in the topics previously listed. Submissions which can be construed as product or service descriptions (adverts) will likely be deemed inappropriate. Other approaches such as use case studies are welcome but must be clearly related to conference topics.

Accepted presenters must submit their full paper (on time) and give their presentation and answer questions in English, as well as follow the XML Prague 2016 conference guidelines.

I don’t travel but am interested in co-authoring a paper with someone who plans on attending XML Prague 2016. Contact me at patrick@durusau.net.

Cassandra Summit 2015 (videos)

Thursday, October 29th, 2015

Cassandra Summit 2015

Courtesy of DataStax, thirty-six (36) presentations from Cassandra Summit 2015 are now online!

Clojure Remote February 11-12, 2016 — Online

Thursday, October 15th, 2015

Clojure Remote February 11-12, 2016 — Online

Important Dates:

  • Oct. 15 — Early-bird admission starts.
  • Oct. 30 — CFP opens, Regular admission rate begins
  • Dec. 31 — CFP closes
  • Jan. 15 — Schedule released
  • Feb. 11, 12 — The Conference!

From the webpage:

This Winter, Homegrown Labs presents Clojure Remote—Clojure’s first exclusively Remote conference. Join us anywhere; from your home, your office, or the coffee shop.

Over two days, you’ll join hundreds of other Clojurists online via crowdcast.io to enjoy up to two tracks of beginner to intermediate Clojure talks.

Clojure Remote will be held February 11th and 12th, 2016 from 2:00 PM UTC – 9:00 pm UTC.

The conference will be broadcast via crowdcast.io, where attendees can:

  • View talks live
  • Ask & up-vote questions
  • And chat with fellow attendees.

Clojure Remote attendees will miss:

  • Delays and frustrations of airport security and missed connections
  • Wedging themselves into grade school size airline seats
  • Taxi transportation where drivers speak every language but yours
  • Disease producing dry air in hotels
  • Expenses that could have gone towards new hardware or books

but, for virtual conferences to make progress, sacrifices have to be made. 😉

True, virtual conferences do lack some of the randomness and “press the flesh” opportunities of physical conferences but CS has been slow to take up the advantages of more frequent but shorter virtual or online conferences.

Balisage 2016!

Monday, September 28th, 2015

From my inbox this morning:

Mark Your Calendars: Balisage 2016
 - pre-conference symposium 1 August 2016
 - Balisage: The Markup Conference 2-5 August 2016

Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center
5701 Marinelli Road  
North Bethesda, Maryland  20852
USA 

This much advanced notice makes me think someone had a toe curling good time at Balisage 2015.

Was Bill Clinton there? 😉

Attend Balisage 2016, look for Bill Clinton or someone else with a silly grin on their faces!

Clojure Remote – Coming February 2016

Friday, September 11th, 2015

Clojure Remote – Coming February 2016

From the webpage:

Clojure Remote will be Clojure’s first exclusively remote conference. While I firm up the details, sign up to get news as it happens, and take an opportunity to provide any feedback you have on how you’d like to see the conference run.

Sounds interesting!

I’ve signed up for more details as they arrive.

You?

Internationalization & Unicode Conference ICU 39

Thursday, June 25th, 2015

Internationalization & Unicode Conference ICU 39

October 26-28, 2015 – Santa Clara, CA USA

From the webpage:

The Internationalization and Unicode® Conference (IUC) is the premier event covering the latest in industry standards and best practices for bringing software and Web applications to worldwide markets. This annual event focuses on software and Web globalization, bringing together internationalization experts, tools vendors, software implementers, and business and program managers from around the world. 

Expert practitioners and industry leaders present detailed recommendations for businesses looking to expand to new international markets and those seeking to improve time to market and cost-efficiency of supporting existing markets. Recent conferences have provided specific advice on designing software for European countries, Latin America, China, India, Japan, Korea, the Middle East, and emerging markets.

This highly rated conference features excellent technical content, industry-tested recommendations and updates on the latest standards and technology. Subject areas include web globalization, programming practices, endangered languages and un-encoded scripts, integrating with social networking software, and implementing mobile apps. This year’s conference will also highlight new features in Unicode and other relevant standards. 

In addition, please join us in welcoming over 20 first-time speakers to the program! This is just another reason to attend; fresh talks, fresh faces, and fresh ideas!

(emphasis and colors in original)

If you want your software to be an edge case and hard to migrate in the future, go ahead, don’t support Unicode. Unicode libraries exist in all the major and many minor programming languages. Not supporting Unicode isn’t simpler, it’s just dumber.

Sorry, I have been a long time follower of the Unicode work and an occasional individual member of the Consortium. Those of us old enough to remember pre-Unicode days want to lessen the burden of interchanging texts, not increase it.

Enjoy the conference!

Announcing SparkR: R on Spark [Spark Summit next week – free live streaming]

Wednesday, June 10th, 2015

Announcing SparkR: R on Spark by Shivaram Venkataraman.

From the post:

I am excited to announce that the upcoming Apache Spark 1.4 release will include SparkR, an R package that allows data scientists to analyze large datasets and interactively run jobs on them from the R shell.

R is a popular statistical programming language with a number of extensions that support data processing and machine learning tasks. However, interactive data analysis in R is usually limited as the runtime is single-threaded and can only process data sets that fit in a single machine’s memory. SparkR, an R package initially developed at the AMPLab, provides an R frontend to Apache Spark and using Spark’s distributed computation engine allows us to run large scale data analysis from the R shell.

The short news here or go to the Spark Summit to get the full story. (Code Databricks20 gets a 20% discount) (That’s next week, June 15 – 17, San Francisco. You need to act quickly.)

BTW, you can register for free live streaming!

Looking forward to this!

NoSQL Now! 2015

Wednesday, June 3rd, 2015

NoSQL Now! 2015

nosql-2015

There is a strong graph track but if your interests lie elsewhere, you won’t be disappointed!

BTW, register by July 17, 2015 for a 20% discount off the standard price. (That gets the full event below $500. For three days in San Jose? That’s a real bargain.)

Balisage 2015 Program Is Out!

Wednesday, May 27th, 2015

Balisage 2015 Program

Tommie Usdin posted this message announcing the Balisage 2015 program:

I think this is an especially strong Balisage program with a good mix of theoretical and practical. The 2015 program includes case studies from journal publishing, regulatory compliance systems, and large-scale document systems; formatting XML for print and browser-based print formatting; visualizing XML structures and documents. Technical papers cover such topics as: MathML; XSLT; use of XML in government and the humanities; XQuery; design of authoring systems; uses of markup that vary from poetry to spreadsheets to cyber justice; and hyperdocument link management.

Good as far as it goes but a synopsis (omitting blurbs and debauchery events) of the program works better for me:

  • The art of the elevator pitch B. Tommie Usdin, Mulberry Technologies
  • Markup as index interface: Thinking like a search engine Mary Holstege, MarkLogic
  • Markup and meter: Using XML tools to teach a computer to think about versification David J. Birnbaum, Elise Thorsen, University of Pittsburgh
  • XML (almost) all the way: Experiences with a small-scale journal publishing system Peter Flynn, University College Cork
  • The state of MathML in K-12 educational publishing Autumn Cuellar, Design Science Jean Kaplansky, Safari Books Online
  • Diagramming XML: Exploring concepts, constraints and affordances Liam R. E. Quin, W3C
  • Spreadsheets – 90+ million end user programmers with no comment tracking or version control Patrick Durusau Sam Hunting
  • State chart XML as a modeling technique in web engineering Anne
    Brüggemann-Klein
    , Marouane Sayih, Zlatina Cheva, Technische Universität München
  • Implementing a system at US Patent and Trademark Office to fully automate the conversion of filing documents to XML Terrel Morris, US Patent and Trademark Office Mark Gross, Data Conversion Laboratory Amit Khare, CGI Federal
  • XML solutions for Swedish farmers: A case study Ari Nordström, Creative Words
  • XSDGuide — Automated generation of web interfaces from XML schemas: A case study for suspicious activity reporting Fabrizio Gotti, Université de Montréal Kevin Heffner, Pegasus Research & Technologies Guy Lapalme, Université de Montréal
  • Tricolor automata C. M. Sperberg-McQueen, Black Mesa Technologies; Technische Universität Darmstadt
  • Two from three (in XSLT) John Lumley, jωL Research / Saxonica
  • XQuery as a data integration language Hans-Jürgen Rennau, Traveltainment Christian Grün, BaseX
  • Smart content for high-value communications David White, Quark Software
  • Vivliostyle: An open-source, web-browser based, CSS typesetting engine Shinyu Murakami, Johannes Wilm, Vivliostyle
  • Panel discussion: Quality assurance in XML transformation
  • Comparing and diffing XML schemas Priscilla Walmsley, Datypic
  • Applying intertextual semantics to cyberjustice: Many reality checks for the price of one Yves Marcoux, Université de Montréal
  • UnderDok: XML structured attributes, change tracking, and the metaphysics of documents Claus Huitfeldt, University of Bergen, Norway
  • Hyperdocument authoring link management using Git and XQuery in service of an abstract hyperdocument management model applied to DITA hyperdocuments Eliot Kimber, Contrext
  • Extending the cybersecurity digital thread with XForms Joshua Lubell, National Institute of Standards and Technology
  • Calling things by their true names: Descriptive markup and the search for a perfect language C. M. Sperberg-McQueen, Black Mesa Technologies; Technische Universität Darmstadt

Now are you ready to register and make your travel arrangements?

Disclaimer: I have no idea why the presentation: Spreadsheets – 90+ million end user programmers with no comment tracking or version control is highlighted in your browser. Have you checked your router for injection attacks by the NSA? 😉

PS: If you are doing a one-day registration, the Spreadsheets presentation is Wednesday, August 12, 2015, 9:00 AM. Just saying.

Global Investigative Journalism Conference (Lillehammer, October 8th-11th 2015)

Sunday, May 24th, 2015

Global Investigative Journalism Conference (Lillehammer, October 8th-11th 2015)

From the news page:

This year’s global event for muckrakers is approaching! Today we’re pleased to reveal the first glimpse of the program for the 9th Global Investigative Journalism Conference — #GIJC15 — in Lillehammer, Norway.

First in line are the data tracks. We have 56 sessions dedicated to data-driven journalism already confirmed, and there is more to come.

Three of the four data tracks will be hands-on, while a fourth will be showcases. In addition to that, the local organizing committee has planned a Data Pub.

The heavy security and scraping stuff will be in a special room, with three days devoted to security issues and webscraping with Python. The attendees will be introduced to how to encrypt emails, their own laptop and USB-sticks. They will also be trained to install security apps for text and voice. For those who think Python is too difficult, import.io is an option.

For the showcases, we hope the audience will appreciate demonstrations from some of the authors behind the Verification Handbook, on advanced internet search techniques and using social media in research. There will be sessions on how to track financial crime, and the journalists behind LuxLeaks and SwissLeaks will conduct different sessions.

BTW, you can become a sponsor for the conference:

Interested in helping sponsor the GIJC? Here’s a chance to reach and support the “special forces” of journalism around the world – the reporters, editors, producers and programmers on the front lines of battling crime, corruption, abuse of trust, and lack of accountability. You’ll join major media organizations, leading technology companies, and influential foundations. Contact us at hello@gijn.org.

Opposing “crime, corruption, abuse of trust, and lack of accountability?” There are easier ways to make a living but few are as satisfying.

PS: Looks like a good venue for discussing how topic maps could integrate resources from different sources or researchers.