Archive for the ‘Conferences’ Category

Haystack: The Search Relevance Conference! (Proposals by Jan. 19, 2018) Updated

Friday, December 8th, 2017

Haystack: The Search Relevance Conference!

From the webpage:

Haystack is the conference for improving search relevance. If you’re like us, you work to understand the shiny new tools or dense academic papers out there that promise the moon. Then you puzzle how to apply those insights to your search problem, in your search stack. But the path isn’t always easy, and the promised gains don’t always materialize.

Haystack is the no-holds-barred conference for organizations where search, matching, and relevance really matters to the bottom line. For search managers, developers & data scientists finding ways to innovate, see past the silver bullets, and share what actually has worked well for their unique problems. Please come share and learn!

… (inline form for submission proposals)

Welcome topics include

  • Information Retrieval
  • Learning to Rank
  • Query Understanding
  • Semantic Search
  • Applying NLP to search
  • Personalized Search
  • Search UX Strategy: Perceived relevance, smart snippeting
  • Measuring and testing search against business objectives
  • Nuts & bolts: plugins for Solr, Elasticsearch, Vespa, etc
  • Adjacent topics: recommendation systems, entity matching via search, and other topics

… (emphasis in original)

The first link for the conference I saw was http://mailchi.mp/e609fba68dc6/announcing-haystack-the-search-relevance-conference, which promised topics including:

  • Intent detection

The modest price of $75 covers our costs….

To see a solution to the problem of other minds and to discover their intent, all for $75, is quite a bargain. Especially since the $75 covers breakfast and lunch both days, plus dinner the first day in a beer hall. 😉

Even without solving philosophical problems, sponsorship by OpenSource Connections is enough to recommend this conference without reservation.

My expectation is this conference is going to rock for hard core search geeks!

PS: Ask if videos will be posted. Thanks!

The Top-100 rated Devoxx Belgium 2017 talks (or the full 207)

Thursday, December 7th, 2017

The Top-100 rated Devoxx Belgium 2017 talks

The top-100 list has Devoxx Belgium 2017 talks sorted in voting order, with hyperlinks to the top 50.

If you are looking for more comprehensive coverage of Devoxx Belgium 2017, try the Devoxx Belgium 2017 YouTube Playlist, with 207 videos!

Kudos to Devoxx for putting conference content online to spread the word about technology.

INFILTRATE 2018 – Vote on Papers – Closes 14 December 2017

Wednesday, December 6th, 2017

INFILTRATE 2018 – OPEN CFP

Cast your vote for the talks you want to see at INFILTRATE 2018.

As of today, 6 December 2017, I count 26 presentations.

The titles alone are enough to sell the conference:

  1. Energy Larceny-Breaking into a solar power plant
  2. Chainspotting: Building Exploit Chains with Logic Bugs
  3. Back To The Future – Going Back In Time To Abuse Android's JIT
  4. Windows Offender: Attacking The Windows Defender Emulator
  5. Bypassing Mitigations by Attacking JIT Server in Microsoft Edge
  6. A year of inadvertent macOS bugs
  7. L'art de l’Évasion: Modern VMWare Exploitation techniques
  8. Unboxing your VirtualBoxes: A close look at a desktop hypervisor
  9. Fuzzing the ‘Unfuzzable’
  10. How to become a Penetration tester – an attempt to guide the next generation of hackers
  11. Parasite OS
  12. Detecting Reverse Engineering with Canaries
  13. Discovering & exploiting a Cisco ASA pre-auth RCE vulnerability
  14. Synthetic Reality; Breaking macOS One Click at a Time
  15. Dissecting QNX – Analyzing & Breaking QNX Exploit Mitigations and Secure Random Number Generators
  16. Malware​ ​ tradecrafts​ ​ and nasty​ ​ secrets​ ​ of​ ​ evading​ ​ to escalating
  17. Sandbox evasion using VBA Referencing
  18. Exploits in Wetware
  19. How to escalate privileges to SYSTEM in Windows 10
  20. Pack your Android: Everything you need to know about Android Boxing
  21. How to hide your browser 0-days
  22. So you think IoT DDoS botnets are dangerous – Bypassing ISP and Enterprise Anti-DDoS with 90's techn
  23. Making love to Enterprise Software
  24. I Did it Thrawn’s Way- Spiels and the Symbiosis of Red Teaming & Threat Intelligence Analysis
  25. Digital Vengeance: Exploiting Notorious C&C Toolkits
  26. Advanced Social Engineering and OSINT for Penetration Testing

Another example of open sharing as opposed to the hoard and privilege approach of the defensive cybersecurity community. White hats are fortunate to only be a decade behind. Consider it the paranoia penalty. Fear of sharing knowledge harms you more than anyone else.

Speaking of sharing, the archives for INFILTRATE 2011 through INFILTRATE 2017 are online.

May not be true for any particular exploit, but given the lagging nature of cyberdefense, not to mention shoddy patch application, any technique less than ten years old is likely still viable. Remember SQL injection turned 17 this year and remains the #1 threat to websites.

Vote on your favorite papers for INFILTRATE 2018 – OPEN CFP
and let’s see some great tweet coverage for the conference!

INFILTRATE Security Conference, April 26 & 27 2018, @Fountainbleau Hotel

INFILTRATE is a deep technical conference that focuses entirely on offensive security issues. Groundbreaking researchers focused on the latest technical issues will demonstrate techniques that you cannot find elsewhere. INFILTRATE is the single-most important event for those who are focused on the technical aspects of offensive security issues, for example, computer and network exploitation, vulnerability discovery, and rootkit and trojan covert protocols. INFILTRATE eschews policy and high-level presentations in favor of just hard-core thought-provoking technical meat.

Registration: infiltrate@immunityincdotcom

Twitter: @InfiltrateCon.

Enjoy!

Call For Cyber Weapons (Arsenal at Black Hat Asia 2018)

Wednesday, November 15th, 2017

Welcome to Arsenal at Black Hat Asia 2018 – Call for Tools Open

Deadline: January 10 at 23:59 Pacific

From the webpage:

The Black Hat Arsenal team will be back in Singapore with the very same goal: give hackers & security researchers the opportunity to demo their newest and latest code.

The Arsenal tool demo area is dedicated to researchers and the open source community. The concept is quite simple: we provide the space and you bring your machine to showcase your work and answer questions from delegates attending Black Hat.

Once again, the ToolsWatch (@toolswatch) team will work in conjunction with Black Hat for the special event Black Hat Arsenal Asia 2018.

The 16th session will be held at the Marina Bay Sands in Singapore from March 22-March 23, 2018.

The same rules to consider before applying to Arsenal:

  • Bring your computer (with VGA output), adapter, your tool, your stickers
  • Avoid stodgy presentations. Folks are expecting action, so give’em action.
  • No vendor pitches or gear!
  • Be yourself, be cool, and wear a smile.
  • Hug the folks at Arsenal :)
  • Above all, have tremendous fun!!

For any questions, contact blackhatarsenal@ubm.com.

*Please note: You may use the plaint text “Upload File” section if you wish to include whitepapers or research; however, this field is optional and not required.

Not as much advance notice as you have for Balisage 2018 but surely you are building new tools on a regular basis!

As you have learned from tools written by others, come to Arsenal at Black Hat Asia 2018 and enable others to learn from you.

Terminology: I say “weapons” instead of “tools” to highlight the lack of any “us” when it comes to cybersecurity.

Governments and corporations have an interest in personal privacy and security only when it furthers their agendas and none when it doesn’t.

Making governments and corporations more secure isn’t in my interest. Is it in yours? (Governments have declared their lack of interest in your privacy and security by their actions. Nothing more need be said.)

XML Prague 2017 – 21 Reasons to Attend 2018 – Offensive Use of XQuery

Monday, November 13th, 2017

XML Prague 2017 Videos

Need reasons for your attending XML Prague 2018?

The XML Prague 2017 YouTube playlist has twenty-one (21) very good reasons (videos). (You may have to hold the hands of c-suite types if you share the videos with them.)

Two things that I see missing from the presentations, security and offensive use of XQuery.

XML Security

You may have noticed that corporations, governments and others have been hemorrhaging data in 2017 (and before). While legislators wail ineffectually and wish for a 18th century world, the outlook for cybersecurity looks grim for 2018.

XML and XML applications exist in a law of the jungle security context. But there weren’t any presentations on security related issues at XML Prague in 2017. Are you going to break the ice in 2018?

Offensive use of XQuery

XQuery has the power to extract, enhance and transform data to serve your interests, not those of its authors.

I’ve heard the gospel that technologists should disarm themselves and righteously await a better day. Meanwhile, governments, military forces, banks, and their allies loot and rape the Earth and its peoples.

Are data scientists at the NSA, FSB, MSS, MI6, Mossad, CIA, etc., constrained by your “do no evil” creeds?

Present governments or their successors, can move towards more planet and people friendly policies, but they require, ahem, encouragement.

XQuery, which doesn’t depend upon melting data centers, supercomputers, global data vacuuming, etc., can help supply that encouragement.

How would you use XQuery to transform government data to turn it against its originator?

2nd International Electronic Conference on Remote Sensing – March 22 – April 5, 2018

Thursday, October 26th, 2017

2nd International Electronic Conference on Remote Sensing

From the webpage:

We are very pleased to announce that the 2nd International Electronic Conference on Remote Sensing (ECRS-2) will be held online, between 22 March and 5 April 2018.

Today, remote sensing is already recognised as an important tool for monitoring our planet and assessing the state of our environment. By providing a wealth of information that is used to make sound decisions on key issues for humanity such as climate change, natural resource monitoring and disaster management, it changes our world and affects the way we think.

Nevertheless, it is very inspirational that we continue to witness a constant growth of amazing new applications, products and services in different fields (e.g. archaeology, agriculture, forestry, environment, climate change, natural and anthropogenic hazards, weather, geology, biodiversity, coasts and oceans, topographic mapping, national security, humanitarian aid) which are based on the use of satellite and other remote sensing data. This growth can be attributed to the following: large number (larger than ever before) of available platforms for data acquisition, new sensors with improved characteristics, progress in computer technology (hardware, software), advanced data analysis techniques, and access to huge volumes of free and commercial remote sensing data and related products.

Following the success of the 1st International Electronic Conference on Remote Sensing (http://sciforum.net/conference/ecrs-1), ECRS-2 aims to cover all recent advances and developments related to this exciting and rapidly changing field, including innovative applications and uses.

We are confident that participants of this unique multidisciplinary event will have the opportunity to get involved in discussions on theoretical and applied aspects of remote sensing that will contribute to shaping the future of this discipline.

ECRS-2 (http://sciforum.net/conference/ecrs-2) is hosted on sciforum, the platform developed by MDPI for organising electronic conferences and discussion groups, and is supported by Section Chairs and a Scientific Committee comprised of highly reputable experts from academia.

It should be noted that there is no cost for active participation and attendance of this virtual conference. Experts from different parts of the world are encouraged to submit their work and take the exceptional opportunity to present it to the remote sensing community.

I have a less generous view of remote sensing, seeing it used to further exploit/degrade the environment, manipulate regulatory processes, and to generally disadvantage those not skilled in its use.

Being aware of the latest developments in remote sensing is a first step towards developing your ability to question, defend and even use remote sensing data for your own ends.

ECRS-2 (http://sciforum.net/conference/ecrs-2) is a great opportunity to educate yourself about remote sensing. Enjoy!

While electronic conferences lack the social immediacy of physical gatherings, one wonders why more data technologies aren’t holding electronic conferences? Thoughts?

XML Prague 2018 – Apology to Procrastinators

Thursday, October 12th, 2017

Apology to all procrastinators, I just saw the Call for Proposals for XML Prague 2018

You only have 50 days (until November 30, 2017) to submit your proposals for XML Prague 2018.

Efficient people don’t realize that 50 days is hardly enough time to put off thinking about a proposal topic, much less fail to write down anything for a proposal. Completely unreasonable demand but, do try to procrastinate quickly and get a proposal done for XML Prague 2018.

The suggestion of doing a “…short video…” seems rife with potential for humor and/or NSFW images. Perhaps XML Prague will post the best “…short videos…” to YouTube?

From the webpage:

XML Prague 2018 now welcomes submissions for presentations on the following topics:

  • Markup and the Extensible Web – HTML5, XHTML, Web Components, JSON and XML sharing the common space
  • Semantic visions and the reality – micro-formats, semantic data in business, linked data
  • Publishing for the 21th century – publishing toolchains, eBooks, EPUB, DITA, DocBook, CSS for print, …
  • XML databases and Big Data – XML storage, indexing, query languages, …
  • State of the XML Union – updates on specs, the XML community news, …
  • XML success stories – real-world use cases of successful XML deployments

There are several different types of slots available during the conference and you can indicate your preferred slot during submission:

30 minutes
15 minutes
These slots are suitable for normal conference talks.
90 minutes (unconference)
Ideal for holding users meeting or workshop during the unconference day (Thursday).

All proposals will be submitted for review by a peer review panel made up of the XML Prague Program Committee. Submissions will be chosen based on interest, applicability, technical merit, and technical correctness.

Authors should strive to contain original material and belong in the topics previously listed. Submissions which can be construed as product or service descriptions (adverts) will likely be deemed inappropriate. Other approaches such as use case studies are welcome but must be clearly related to conference topics.

Proposals can have several forms:

full paper
In our opinion still ideal and classical way of proposing presentation. Full paper gives reviewers enough information to properly asses your proposal.
extended abstract
Concise 1-4 page long description of your topic. If you do not have time to write full paper proposal this is one possible way to go. Try to make your extended abstract concrete and specific. Too short or vague abstract will not convince reviewers that it is worth including into the conference schedule.
short video (max. 5 minutes)
If you are not writing person but you still have something interesting to present. Simply capture short video (no longer then 5 minutes) containing part of your presentation. Video can capture you or it can be screen cast.

I mentioned XSLT security attacks recently, perhaps you could do something similar on XQuery? Other ways to use XML and related technologies to breach cybersecurity?

Do submit proposals and enjoy XML Prague 2018!

Procrastinators – Dates/Location for Balisage: The Markup Conference 2018

Wednesday, October 4th, 2017

Procrastinators can be caught short, without enough time for proper procrastination on papers and slides.

To insure ample time for procrastination, Balisage: The Markup Conference 2018 has published its dates and location.

31 July 2018–3 August 2018 … Balisage: The Markup Conference
30 July 2018 … Symposium – topic to be announced
CAMBRiA Hotel & Suites
1 Helen Heneghan Way
Rockville, Maryland 20850
USA

For indecisive procrastinators, Balisage offers suggestions for your procrastination:

The 2017 program included papers discussing XML vocabularies, cutting-edge digital humanities, lossless JSON/XML roundtripping, reflections on concrete syntax and abstract syntax, parsing and generation, web app development using the XML stack, managing test cases, pipelining and micropipelinging, electronic health records, rethinking imperative algorithms for XSLT and XQuery, markup and intellectual property, digitiziging Ethiopian and Eritrean manuscripts, exploring “shapes” in RDF and their relationship to schema validation, exposing XML data to users of varying technical skill, test-suite management, and use case studies about large conversion applications, DITA, and SaxonJS.

Innovative procrastinators can procrastinate on other related topics, including any they find on the Master Topic List (ideas procrastinated on for prior Balisage conferences).

Take advantage of this opportunity to procrastinate early and long on your Balisage submissions. You and your audience will be glad you did!

PS: Don’t procrastinate on saying thank you to Tommie Usdin and company for another year of Balisage. Balisage improves XML theory and practice every year it is held.

Balisage: The Markup Conference 2017 Program Now Available

Wednesday, May 17th, 2017

Balisage: The Markup Conference 2017 Program Now Available

An email from Tommie Usdin, Chair, Chief Organizer and herder of markup cats for Balisage advises:

Balisage: where serious markup practitioners and theoreticians meet every August.

The 2017 program includes papers discussing XML vocabularies, cutting-edge digital humanities, lossless JSON/XML roundtripping, reflections on concrete syntax and abstract syntax, parsing and generation, web app development using the XML stack, managing test cases, pipelining and micropipelinging, electronic health records, rethinking imperative algorithms for XSLT and XQuery, markup and intellectual property, why YOU should use (my favorite XML vocabulary), developing a system to aid in studying manuscripts in the tradition of the Ethiopian and Eritrean Highlands, exploring “shapes” in RDF and their relationship to schema validation, exposing XML data to users of varying technical skill, test-suite management, and use case studies about large conversion applications, DITA, and SaxonJS.

Up-Translation and Up-Transformation: A one-day Symposium on the goals, challenges, solutions, and workflows for significant XML enhancements, including approaches, tools, and techniques that may potentially be used for a variety of other tasks. The symposium will be of value not only to those facing up-translation and transformation but also to general XML practitioners seeking to get the most out of their data.

Are you interested in open information, reusable documents, and vendor and application independence? Then you need descriptive markup, and Balisage is your conference. Balisage brings together document architects, librarians, archivists, computer scientists, XML practitioners, XSLT and XQuery programmers, implementers of XSLT and XQuery engines and other markup-related software, semantic-Web evangelists, standards developers, academics, industrial researchers, government and NGO staff, industrial developers, practitioners, consultants, and the world’s greatest concentration of markup theorists. Some participants are busy designing replacements for XML while other still use SGML (and know why they do).

Discussion is open, candid, and unashamedly technical.

Balisage 2017 Program:
http://www.balisage.net/2017/Program.html

Symposium Program:
https://www.balisage.net/UpTransform

NOTE: Members of the TEI and their employees are eligible for discount Balisage registration.

You need to see the program for yourself but the highlights (for me) include: Ethiopic manuscripts (ok, so I have odd tastes), Earley parsers (of particular interest), English Majors (my wife was an English major), and a number of other high points.

Mark your calendar for July 31 – August 4, 2017 – It’s Balisage!

Balisage Papers Due in 3 Weeks!

Thursday, March 16th, 2017

Apologies for the sudden lack of posting but I have been working on a rather large data set with XQuery and checking forwards and backwards to make sure it can be replicated. (I hate “it works on my computer.”)

Anyway, Tommie Usdin dropped an email bomb today with a reminder that Balisage papers are due on April 7, 2017.

From her email:

Submissions to “Balisage: The Markup Conference” and pre-conference symposium:
“Up-Translation and Up-Transformation: Tasks, Challenges, and Solutions”
are on April 7.

It is time to start writing!

Balisage: The Markup Conference 2017
August 1 — 4, 2017, Rockville, MD (a suburb of Washington, DC)
July 31, 2017 — Symposium Up-Translation and Up-Transformation
https://www.balisage.net/

Balisage: where serious markup practitioners and theoreticians meet every August. We solicit papers on any aspect of markup and its uses; topics include but are not limited to:

• Web application development with XML
• Informal data models and consensus-based vocabularies
• Integration of XML with other technologies (e.g., content management, XSLT, XQuery)
• Performance issues in parsing, XML database retrieval, or XSLT processing
• Development of angle-bracket-free user interfaces for non-technical users
• Semistructured data and full text search
• Deployment of XML systems for enterprise data
• Web application development with XML
• Design and implementation of XML vocabularies
• Case studies of the use of XML for publishing, interchange, or archiving
• Alternatives to XML
• the role(s) of XML in the application lifecycle
• the role(s) of vocabularies in XML environments

Detailed Call for Participation: http://balisage.net/Call4Participation.html
About Balisage: http://balisage.net/Call4Participation.html

pre-conference symposium:
Up-Translation and Up-Transformation: Tasks, Challenges, and Solutions
Chair: Evan Owens, Cenveo
https://www.balisage.net/UpTransform/index.html

Increasing the granularity and/or specificity of markup is an important task in many content and information workflows. Markup transformations might involve tasks such as high-level structuring, detailed component structuring, or enhancing information by matching or linking to external vocabularies or data. Enhancing markup presents secondary challenges including lack of structure of the inputs or inconsistency of input data down to the level of spelling, punctuation, and vocabulary. Source data for up-translation may be XML, word processing documents, plain text, scanned & OCRed text, or databases; transformation goals may be content suitable for page makeup, search, or repurposing, in XML, JSON, or any other markup language.

The range of approaches to up-transformation is as varied as the variety of specifics of the input and required outputs. Solutions may combine automated processing with human review or could be 100% software implementations. With the potential for requirements to evolve over time, tools may have to be actively maintained and enhanced. This is the place to discuss goals, challenges, solutions, and workflows for significant XML enhancements, including approaches, tools, and techniques that may potentially be used for a variety of other tasks.

For more information: info@balisage.net or +1 301 315 9631

I’m planning on posting tomorrow one way or the other!

While you wait for that, get to work on your Balisage paper!

Up-Translation and Up-Transformation … [Balisage Rocks!]

Sunday, January 29th, 2017

Up-Translation and Up-Transformation: Tasks, Challenges, and Solutions (a Balisage pre-conference symposium)

When & Where:

Monday July 31, 2017
CAMBRiA Hotel, Rockville, MD USA

Chair: Evan Owens, Cenveo

You need more details than that?

Ok, from the webpage:

Increasing the granularity and/or specificity of markup is an important task in many different content and information workflows. Markup transformations might involve tasks such as high-level structuring, detailed component structuring, or enhancing information by matching or linking to external vocabularies or data. Enhancing markup presents numerous secondary challenges including lack of structure of the inputs or inconsistency of input data down to the level of spelling, punctuation, and vocabulary. Source data for up-translation may be XML, word processing documents, plain text, scanned & OCRed text, or databases; transformation goals may be content suitable for page makeup, search, or repurposing, in XML, JSON, or any other markup language.

The range of approaches to up-transformation is as varied as the variety of specifics of the input and required outputs. Solutions may combine automated processing with human review or could be 100% software implementations. With the potential for requirements to evolve over time, tools may have to be actively maintained and enhanced.

The presentations in this pre-conference symposium will include goals, challenges, solutions, and workflows for significant XML enhancements, including approaches, tools, and techniques that may potentially be used for a variety of other tasks. The symposium will be of value not only to those facing up-translation and transformation but also to general XML practitioners seeking to get the most out of their data.

If I didn’t know better, up-translation and up-transformation sound suspiciously like conferred properties of topic maps fame.

Well, modulo that conferred properties could be predicated on explicit subject identity and not hidden in the personal knowledge of the author.

There are two categories of up-translation and up-transformation:

  1. Ones that preserve jobs like spaghetti Cobol code, and
  2. Ones that support easy long term maintenance.

While writing your paper for the pre-conference, which category fits yours the best?

4 Days Left – Submission Alert – XML Prague

Sunday, December 11th, 2016

A tweet by Jirka Kosek reminded me there are only 4 days left for XML Prague submissions!

  • December 15th – End of CFP (full paper or extended abstract)
  • January 8th – Notification of acceptance/rejection of paper to authors
  • January 29th – Final paper

From the call for papers:

XML Prague 2017 now welcomes submissions for presentations on the following topics:

  • Markup and the Extensible Web – HTML5, XHTML, Web Components, JSON and XML sharing the common space
  • Semantic visions and the reality – micro-formats, semantic data in business, linked data
  • Publishing for the 21th century – publishing toolchains, eBooks, EPUB, DITA, DocBook, CSS for print, …
  • XML databases and Big Data – XML storage, indexing, query languages, …
  • State of the XML Union – updates on specs, the XML community news, …

All proposals will be submitted for review by a peer review panel made up of the XML Prague Program Committee. Submissions will be chosen based on interest, applicability, technical merit, and technical correctness.

Accepted papers will be included in published conference proceedings.

I don’t travel but if you need a last-minute co-author or proofer, you know where to find me!

Clojure/conj 2016 – Videos – Sorted

Monday, December 5th, 2016

Clojure/conf 2016 has posted videos of all presentations (thanks!) to YouTube, which displays them in no particular order.

To help with my viewing and perhaps yours, here are the videos in title order:

  1. Adventures in Understanding Documents – Scott Tuddenham
  2. Audyx.com 40k locs to build the first web – based sonogram – Asher Coren
  3. Barliman: trying the halting problem backwards, blindfolded – William Byrd, Greg Rosenblatt
  4. Becoming Omniscient with Sayid – Bill Piel
  5. Building a powerful Double Entry Accounting system – Lucas Cavalcanti
  6. Building composable abstractions – Eric Normand
  7. Charting the English Language…in pure Clojure – Alexander Mann
  8. Clarifying Rules Engines with Clara Rules – Mike Rodriguez
  9. Clojure at DataStax: The Long Road From Python to Clojure – Nick Bailey
  10. A Clojure DSL for defining CI/CD orchestrations at scale – Rohit Kumar, Viraj Purang
  11. Composing music with clojure.spec – Wojciech Franke
  12. In situ model-based learning in PAMELA – Paul Robertson, Tom Marble
  13. Juggling Patterns and Programs – Steve Miner
  14. Overcoming the Challenges of Mentoring – Kim Crayton
  15. A Peek Inside SAT Solvers – Jon Smock
  16. Powderkeg: teaching Clojure to Spark – Igor Ges, Christophe Grand
  17. Production Rules on Databases – Paula Gearon
  18. Programming What Cannot Be Programmed: Aesthetics and Narrative – D. Schmüdde
  19. Proto REPL, a New Clojure Development and Visualization Tool – Jason Gilman
  20. Simplifying ETL with Clojure and Datomic – Stuart Halloway
  21. Spec-ulation Keynote – Rich Hickey
  22. Spectrum, a library for statically "typing" clojure.spec – Allen Rohner
  23. Using Clojure with C APIs for crypto and more – lvh
  24. WormBase database migration to Datomic on AWS: A case Study – Adam Wright

Enjoy!

XML Prague 2017, February 9-11, 2017 – Registration Opens!

Wednesday, November 16th, 2016

XML Prague 2017, February 9-11, 2017

I mentioned XML Prague 2017 last month and now, after the election of Donald Trump as president of the United States, registration for the conference opens!

Coincidence?

Maybe. 😉

Even if you are returning to the U.S. after the conference, XML Prague will be a welcome respite from the tempest of news coverage of what isn’t known about the impending Trump administration.

At 120 Euros for three days, this is a great investment both professionally and emotionally.

Enjoy!

XML Prague 2017 is coming

Sunday, October 16th, 2016

XML Prague 2017 is coming by Jirka Kosek.

From the post:

I’m happy to announce that call for papers for XML Prague 2017 is finally open. We are looking forward for your interesting submissions related to XML. We have switched from CMT to EasyChair for managing submission process – we hope that new system will have less quirks for users then previous one.

We are sorry for slightly delayed start than in past years. But we have to setup new non-profit organization for running the conference and sometimes we felt like characters from Kafka’s Der Process during this process.

We are now working hard on redesigning and opening of registration. Process should be more smooth then in the past.

But these are just implementation details. XML Prague will be again three day gathering of XML geeks, users, vendors, … which we all are used to enjoy each year. I’m looking forward to meet you in Prague in February.

Conference: February 9-11, 2016.

Important Dates:

Important Dates:

  • December 15th – End of CFP (full paper or extended abstract)
  • January 8th – Notification of acceptance/rejection of paper to authors
  • January 29th – Final paper

You can see videos of last year’s presentation (to gauge the competition): Watch videos from XML Prague 2016 on Youtube channel.

December the 15th will be here sooner than you think!

Think of it as a welcome distraction from the barn yard posturing that is U.S. election politics this year!

ApacheCon – Seville, Spain – Week of November 14th, 2016

Monday, July 18th, 2016

You have relied on Apache software, read its documentation, contributed (flamed?) on its lists. Attend ApacheCon and meet other members of the Apache community, in full bandwidth, real time.

The call for papers (CFP) for this event is now open, and will remain open until September 9th.

The event is divided into two parts, each with its own CFP. The first part of the event, called Apache Big Data, focuses on Big Data projects and related technologies.

Website: http://events.linuxfoundation.org/events/apache-big-data-europe

CFP: http://events.linuxfoundation.org/events/apache-big-data-europe/program/cfp

The second part, called ApacheCon Europe, focuses on the Apache Software Foundation as a whole, covering all projects, community issues, governance, and so on.

Website: http://events.linuxfoundation.org/events/apachecon-europe

CFP: http://events.linuxfoundation.org/events/apachecon-europe/program/cfp

ApacheCon is the official conference of the Apache Software Foundation, and is the best place to meet members of your project and other ASF projects, and strengthen your project’s community.

If your organization is interested in sponsoring ApacheCon, contact Rich Bowen at evp@apache.org. ApacheCon is a great place to find the brightest developers in the world, and experts on a huge range of technologies.

I lifted this text from an email by missywarnkin@yahoo.com.

Enjoy!

The Feynman Technique – Contest for Balisage 2016?

Tuesday, June 28th, 2016

The Best Way to Learn Anything: The Feynman Technique by Shane Parrish.

From the post:

There are four simple steps to the Feynman Technique, which I’ll explain below:

  1. Choose a Concept
  2. Teach it to a Toddler
  3. Identify Gaps and Go Back to The Source Material
  4. Review and Simplify

This made me think of the late-breaking Balisage 2016 papers posted by Tommie Usdin in email:

  • Saxon-JS – XSLT 3.0 in the Browser, by Debbie Lockett and Michael Kay, Saxonica
  • A MicroXPath for MicroXML (AKA A New, Simpler Way of Looking at XML Data Content), by Uche Ogbuji, Zepheira
  • A catalog of Functional programming idioms in XQuery 3.1, James Fuller, MarkLogic

New contest for Balisage?

Pick a concept from a Balisage 2016 presentation and you have sixty (60) seconds to explain it to Balisage attendees.

What do you think?

Remember, you can’t play if you don’t attend! Register today!

If Tommie agrees, the winner gets me to record a voice mail greeting for their phone! 😉

Balisage 2016 Program Posted! (Newcomers Welcome!)

Monday, May 23rd, 2016

Tommie Usdin wrote today to say:

Balisage: The Markup Conference
2016 Program Now Available
http://www.balisage.net/2016/Program.html

Balisage: where serious markup practitioners and theoreticians meet every August.

The 2016 program includes papers discussing reducing ambiguity in linked-open-data annotations, the visualization of XSLT execution patterns, automatic recognition of grant- and funding-related information in scientific papers, construction of an interactive interface to assist cybersecurity analysts, rules for graceful extension and customization of standard vocabularies, case studies of agile schema development, a report on XML encoding of subtitles for video, an extension of XPath to file systems, handling soft hyphens in historical texts, an automated validity checker for formatted pages, one no-angle-brackets editing interface for scholars of German family names and another for scholars of Roman legal history, and a survey of non-XML markup such as Markdown.

XML In, Web Out: A one-day Symposium on the sub rosa XML that powers an increasing number of websites will be held on Monday, August 1. http://balisage.net/XML-In-Web-Out/

If you are interested in open information, reusable documents, and vendor and application independence, then you need descriptive markup, and Balisage is the conference you should attend. Balisage brings together document architects, librarians, archivists, computer
scientists, XML practitioners, XSLT and XQuery programmers, implementers of XSLT and XQuery engines and other markup-related software, Topic-Map enthusiasts, semantic-Web evangelists, standards developers, academics, industrial researchers, government and NGO staff, industrial developers, practitioners, consultants, and the world’s greatest concentration of markup theorists. Some participants are busy designing replacements for XML while other still use SGML (and know why they do).

Discussion is open, candid, and unashamedly technical.

Balisage 2016 Program: http://www.balisage.net/2016/Program.html

Symposium Program: http://balisage.net/XML-In-Web-Out/symposiumProgram.html

Even if you don’t eat RELAX grammars at snack time, put Balisage on your conference schedule. Even if a bit scruffy looking, the long time participants like new document/information problems or new ways of looking at old ones. Not to mention they, on occasion, learn something from newcomers as well.

It is a unique opportunity to meet the people who engineered the tools and specs that you use day to day.

Be forewarned that most of them have difficulty agreeing what controversial terms mean, like “document,” but that to one side, they are a good a crew as you are likely to meet.

Enjoy!

Before There Was Big Data … There Was XLDB!

Wednesday, May 18th, 2016

9th Extremely Large Databases Conference

Online registration closes 19 May 2016!

May 24-26, 2016

Program

Rumor has it that some sponsorships are still available.

Hard to imagine but check with xldb-admin@slac.stanford.edu if you want to be associated with the premier extreme scale event of the year.

Clojure/west 2016 – Videos! [+ Unix Sort Trick]

Monday, April 18th, 2016

I started seeing references to Clojure/west 2016 videos and to marginally increase your access to them, I have sorted them by author and with a Unix sort trick, by title.

Unix Sort Trick (truthfully, just a new switch to me)

Having the videos in author order is useful but other people may remember a title and not the author.

I want to sort the already created <li> elements with sort, but you can see the obvious problem.

By default, sort uses the entire line for sorting, which given the urls, isn’t going to give the order I want.

To the rescue, the -k switch for sort, which allows you to define which field and character offset in that field to use for sorting.

In this case, I used 1, the default field and then character offset 74, the first character following the > of the <a> element.

Resulted in:

In full: sort -k 1.74 sort-file.txt > sorted-file.txt

Wrestling With Inclusion at LambdaConf [Why Wrestle? Just Do It.]

Friday, March 25th, 2016

Wrestling With Inclusion at LambdaConf by John A De Goes.

From the post:

Last year, StrangeLoop rescinded an invitation to a speaker because of the controversy that erupted (nay, exploded) when his talk was announced.

The controversy had nothing to do with the talk, which by all accounts was a great fit for the eclectic topics served up every year by the conference. Rather, the controversy surrounded the speaker’s political views, which were penned under a pseudonym years prior.

I learned about all this quite recently, and for a very unexpected reason: the same speaker submitted a talk to LambdaConf.

The gender- and person-anonymized talk was endorsed by the review committee, and made it all the way onto the schedule board before a volunteer brought the issue to our attention.

My immediate reaction could be described as a combination of shock and horror. No conference organizer ever wants to face a controversial hailstorm like this!

Far, far too long to read, unless you are interested in an example of public justification taken to its extreme.

Not that I disagree with the decision to include the speaker.

I do disagree that any speaker should be singled out for the sort of vetting that is described in John’s post.

All speakers should be accorded the presumption that they will obey local laws and not attempt to physically harm other conference attendees and will obey any code of conduct for the conference.

Absent evidence to the contrary. Evidence as reports, confirmed by news accounts and/or police reports of attacks at prior conferences or violation of other conference codes of conduct.

If a speaker endangers other attendees and/or violates conference rules of conduct, then don’t allow them to return. But don’t mimic the worse aspects of the developing police state in the United States and attempt to anticipate someone violating a norm of conduct.

Anticipatory regulation of possible future conduct is unfair to the person in question.

Not to mention being a distraction from advancing the subject of your conference.

As John’s post so ably demonstrates.

Imagine the useful articles, posts, code that could have been written with all that effort and strain.

Subject to documented prior arrests for violence against other attendees and/or violation of rules of conduct, modulo declarations to do the same, be inclusive.

What more need be said?

PS: Some people will disagree with that position but they can occupy their own digital space and time with un-responded to comments and diatribes. The right to speak does not imply an obligation to listen.

Logan CIJ Symposium 2016 – Speaker Contacts

Monday, March 21st, 2016

For some reason, conference organizers appear to abhor gathering speaker contact information to a common location. Or in such a way that it could be quickly re-purposed, say for creating a twitter list of those speakers.

The Logan CIJ Syposium 2016 was no different.

But, rather than complain to the conference organizers, I have collated the contact information (if any), for each speaker:

Some had weblinks only, while others only had Twitter accounts.

William Binney, Bernd Fix, John Goetz, Seymour Hersh, Caroline Nevejan, Ana Naomi de Sousa, and Christina Varvia had no contact information listed at all.

I started to ferret that out but then decided perhaps it wasn’t listed for a good reason.

Two requests:

First, pass this list along to others interested in journalism, news and reporting.

Second, point out to conference organizers that presenting author/presenter contact information in a re-usable format benefits everyone in their community.

Re-usable author/presenter contact information in a single location should be the default, not the exceptional case.

27 Reasons to Attend Clojure/West 2016 + Twitter List

Wednesday, February 17th, 2016

Clojure/West 2016 Speakers

I extracted the speaker list plus twitter accounts where available from the speakers list for Clojure/West 2016.

Now you have twenty-seven reasons to attend! Stack those up against any to not attend.

Register: April 15th-16th, Seattle Marriott Waterfront

April 15th is “tax day” in the United States.

Wouldn’t you rather be having fun with Clojure than grubbing around with smudged and/or lost receipts? I thought so. Register today!

Whether the government picks you pocket one day or the next makes little difference.

File early and attend while the tax hounds try to decide if Thai numerals printed in Braille are a legitimate tax return. 😉

  1. Matthias Felleisen Types are like the Weather, Type Systems are like Weathermen
  2. Alex Kehayias Functional Game Engine Design for the Web
  3. Allison Carter, From Fluxus to Functional: A Journey Through Interactive Art
  4. Amie Kuttruff, Deepen and Diversify the Clojure Community with Jr Engineers
  5. Aysylu Greenberg, (+ Loom (years 2))
  6. Bryce Covert, USE lisp WITH game – Making an Adventure Game with Clojure
  7. Christopher Small, Datalog all the way down
  8. Claire Alvis, Creating DSLs – a tale of spec-tacular success and failure
  9. Daniel Higginbotham, Parallel Programming, Fork/Join, and Reducers
  10. Devon Peticolas, One Million Clicks per Minute with Kafka and Clojure
  11. Donevan Dolby, Managing one of the world’s largest Clojure code bases
  12. Gerred Dillon, ClojureScript and Lambda: A Case Study
  13. Ghadi Shayban, Parsing Text with a Virtual Machine
  14. Jack Dubie, Fast full stack testing in om.next
  15. Jonathan Boston, Caleb Phillips, Building a Legal Data Service with Clojure
  16. Katherine Fellows, Anna Pawlicka, ClojureBridge in Practice
  17. Mario Aquino, The Age of Talkies
  18. Michael Drogalis, Inside Onyx
  19. Michał Marczyk, defrecord/deftype in Clojure and ClojureScript
  20. Mikaela Patella, Web Development is Distributed Systems Programming
  21. Nathan Marz, Specter: powerful and simple data structure manipulation
  22. Nathan Sorenson, Hybrid Automata and the Continuous Life
  23. Patrick O’Brien, Braid Chat: Reifying Online Group Conversations
  24. Paula Gearon, Production Rules in Datomic
  25. Peter Schuck Hash Maps: more room at the bottom
  26. Priyatam Mudivarti, Caching half a billion user transactions
  27. Stuart Sierra, The Joys and Perils of Interactive Development

PS: Be careful how you use the term “weathermen.” The professionally paranoid in government remember a different meaning that what you may intend. As do some of the rest of us.

Balisage 2016, 2–5 August 2016 [XML That Makes A Difference!]

Tuesday, February 2nd, 2016

Call for Participation

Dates:

  • 25 March 2016 — Peer review applications due
  • 22 April 2016 — Paper submissions due
  • 21 May 2016 — Speakers notified
  • 10 June 2016 — Late-breaking News submissions due
  • 16 June 2016 — Late-breaking News speakers notified
  • 8 July 2016 — Final papers due from presenters of peer reviewed papers
  • 8 July 2016 — Short paper or slide summary due from presenters of late-breaking news
  • 1 August 2016 — Pre-conference Symposium
  • 2–5 August 2016 — Balisage: The Markup Conference

From the call:

Balisage is the premier conference on the theory, practice, design, development, and application of markup. We solicit papers on any aspect of markup and its uses; topics include but are not limited to:

  • Web application development with XML
  • Informal data models and consensus-based vocabularies
  • Integration of XML with other technologies (e.g., content management, XSLT, XQuery)
  • Performance issues in parsing, XML database retrieval, or XSLT processing
  • Development of angle-bracket-free user interfaces for non-technical users
  • Semistructured data and full text search
  • Deployment of XML systems for enterprise data
  • Web application development with XML
  • Design and implementation of XML vocabularies
  • Case studies of the use of XML for publishing, interchange, or archiving
  • Alternatives to XML
  • the role(s) of XML in the application lifecycle
  • the role(s) of vocabularies in XML environments

Full papers should be submitted by the deadline given below. All papers are peer-reviewed — we pride ourselves that you will seldom get a more thorough, skeptical, or helpful review than the one provided by Balisage reviewers.

Whether in theory or practice, let’s make Balisage 2016 the one people speak of in hushed tones at future markup and information conferences.

Useful semantics continues to flounder about, cf. Vice-President Biden’s interest in “one cancer research language.” Easy enough to say. How hard could it be?

Documents are commonly thought of and processed as if from BOM to EOF is the definition of a document. Much to our impoverishment.

Silo dissing has gotten popular. What if we could have our silos and eat them too?

Let’s set our sights on a Balisage 2016 where non-technicals come away saying “I want that!”

Have your first drafts done well before the end of February, 2016!

Best Paper Awards in Computer Science (2014)

Friday, November 27th, 2015

Best Paper Awards in Computer Science (2014)

From the webpage:

Jeff Huang’s list of the best paper awards from 29 CS conferences since 1996 up to and including 2014.

I saw a tweet about Jeff’s site being updated to include papers from 2014.

If you are looking for reading material in a particular field, this is a good place to start.

For a complete list of the organizations, conferences as expanded abbreviations: see: Best Paper Awards in Computer Science (2013). None of them have changed so I didn’t see the point of repeating them.

Conference Videos for the Holidays

Wednesday, November 18th, 2015

As you know, I saw Alexander Songe’s CRDT: Datatype for the Apocalypse presentation earlier today.

With holidays approaching next week, November 23rd-27th, 2015 in the United States, I thought some of you may need additional high quality video references.

Clojure TV

Elixir Conf 2014.

Elixir Conf 2015

Erlang Solutions

FunctionalTV

LuceneSolrRevolution

No slight intended for any conference videos I didn’t list. I will list different conference videos for the next holiday list, which will appear in December 2015.

Enjoy!

PS: I have to apologize for the poor curating of videos by their hosts. With only a little more effort, these videos could be a valuable day to day resource.

VIS’15 Recap with Robert Kosara and Johanna Fulda (DS #63)

Friday, November 13th, 2015

VIS’15 Recap with Robert Kosara and Johanna Fulda (DS #63)

data-story-podcast

And that’s not the entire agenda for the podcast!

So say nothing of the fourteen links to papers, videos and pre-views that follow the podcast agenda.

A recap of the 2015 IEEE Visualization Conference (VIS) (25 Oct – 30 Oct 2015).

If you missed the conference or just want a great weekend activity, consider the podcast and related resources.

Wrangler Conference 2015

Friday, November 13th, 2015

Wrangler Conference 2015

Videos!

Given the panel nature of some of the presentatons, ordering these videos by speaker would not be terribly useful.

However, I have exposed the names of the participants in a single list of all the videos.

Enjoy!

XML Prague 2016 – Call for Papers [Looking for a co-author?]

Tuesday, November 3rd, 2015

XML Prague 2016 – Call for Papers

Important Dates:

  • November 30th – End of CFP (full paper or extended abstract)
  • January 4th – Notification of acceptance/rejection of paper to authors
  • January 25th – Final paper
  • February 11-13, XML Prague 2016

From the webpage:

XML Prague 2016 now welcomes submissions for presentations on the following topics:

  • Markup and the Extensible Web – HTML5, XHTML, Web Components, JSON and XML sharing the common space
  • Semantic visions and the reality – micro-formats, semantic data in business, linked data
  • Publishing for the 21th century – publishing toolchains, eBooks, EPUB, DITA, DocBook, CSS for print, …
  • XML databases and Big Data – XML storage, indexing, query languages, …
  • State of the XML Union – updates on specs, the XML community news, …

All proposals will be submitted for review by a peer review panel made up of the XML Prague Program Committee. Submissions will be chosen based on interest, applicability, technical merit, and technical correctness.

Accepted papers will be included in published conference proceedings.

Authors should strive to contain original material and belong in the topics previously listed. Submissions which can be construed as product or service descriptions (adverts) will likely be deemed inappropriate. Other approaches such as use case studies are welcome but must be clearly related to conference topics.

Accepted presenters must submit their full paper (on time) and give their presentation and answer questions in English, as well as follow the XML Prague 2016 conference guidelines.

I don’t travel but am interested in co-authoring a paper with someone who plans on attending XML Prague 2016. Contact me at patrick@durusau.net.