Archive for the ‘Web History’ Category

If You See Something, Save Something (Poke A Censor In The Eye)

Thursday, August 17th, 2017

If You See Something, Save Something – 6 Ways to Save Pages In the Wayback Machine by Alexis Rossi.

From the post:

In recent days many people have shown interest in making sure the Wayback Machine has copies of the web pages they care about most. These saved pages can be cited, shared, linked to – and they will continue to exist even after the original page changes or is removed from the web.

There are several ways to save pages and whole sites so that they appear in the Wayback Machine. Here are 6 of them.

In the comments, Ellen Spertus mentions a 7th way: Donate to the Internet Archive!

It’s the age of censorship, by governments, DMCA, the EU (right to be forgotten), Facebook, Google, Twitter and others.

Poke a censor in the eye, see something, save something to the Wayback Machine.

The Wayback Machine can’t stop all censorship, so save local and remote copies as well.

Keep poking until all censors go blind.

Schema.org and One Hundred Years of Search

Thursday, July 26th, 2012

Schema.org and One Hundred Years of Search by Dan Brickley.

From the post:

Slides and video are already in the Web, but I wanted to post this as an excuse to plug the new Web History Community Group that Max and I have just started at W3C. The talk was part of the Libraries, Media and the Semantic Web meetup hosted by the BBC in March. It gave an opportunity to run through some forgotten history, linking Paul Otlet, the Universal Decimal Classification, schema.org and some 100 year old search logs from Otlet’s Mundaneum. Having worked with the BBC Lonclass system (a descendant of Otlet’s UDC), and collaborated with the Aida Slavic of the UDC on their publication of Linked Data, I was happy to be given the chance to try to spell out these hidden connections. It also turned out that Google colleagues have been working to support the Mundaneum and the memory of this early work, and I’m happy that the talk led to discussions with both the Mundaneum and Computer History Museum about the new Web History group at W3C.

Sounds like a great starting point!

But the intellectual history of indexing and search runs far deeper than one hundred years. Our current efforts are likely to profit from a deeper knowledge of our roots.