Archive for the ‘Knowledge Economics’ Category

Drug data reveal sneaky side effects

Sunday, March 18th, 2012

Drug data reveal sneaky side effects

From the post:

An algorithm designed by US scientists to trawl through a plethora of drug interactions has yielded thousands of previously unknown side effects caused by taking drugs in combination.

The work, published today in Science Translational Medicine [Tatonetti, N. P., Ye, P. P., Daneshjou, R. and Altman, R. B. Sci. Transl. Med. 4, 125ra31 (2012).], provides a way to sort through the hundreds of thousands of ‘adverse events’ reported to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) each year. “It’s a step in the direction of a complete catalogue of drug–drug interactions,” says the study’s lead author, Russ Altman, a bioengineer at Stanford University in California.

From later in the post:

The team then used this method to compile a database of 1,332 drugs and possible side effects that were not listed on the labels for those drugs. The algorithm came up with an average of 329 previously unknown adverse events for each drug — far surpassing the average of 69 side effects listed on most drug labels.

Double trouble

The team also compiled a similar database looking at interactions between pairs of drugs, which yielded many more possible side effects than could be attributed to either drug alone. When the data were broken down by drug class, the most striking effect was seen when diuretics called thiazides, often prescribed to treat high blood pressure and oedema, were used in combination with a class of drugs called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, used to treat depression. Compared with people who used either drug alone, patients who used both drugs were significantly more likely to experience a heart condition known as prolonged QT, which is associated with an increased risk of irregular heartbeats and sudden death.

A search of electronic medical records from Stanford University Hospital confirmed the relationship between these two drug classes, revealing a roughly 1.5-fold increase in the likelihood of prolonged QT when the drugs were combined, compared to when either drug was taken alone. Altman says that the next step will be to test this finding further, possibly by conducting a clinical trial in which patients are given both drugs and then monitored for prolonged QT.

This data could be marketed to drug companies, trial lawyers (both sides), medical malpractice insurers, etc. This is an example of the data marketing I mentioned in Knowledge Economics II.

Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences – Proceedings – TM Value-Add

Sunday, March 18th, 2012

Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences

The Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS) is the sponsor of the Knowledge Economics conference I mentioned earlier today.

It has a rich history (see below) and just as importantly, free access to its proceedings back to 2005, via the CS Digital Library (ignore the wording that you need to login).

I did have to locate the new page which is: HCISS Proceedings 1995 –.

The proceedings illustrate why a topic map that captures prior experience can be beneficial.

For example, the entry for 1995 reads:

  • 28th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS’95)
  • 28th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS’95)
  • 28th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences
  • 28th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS’95)
  • 28th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS’95)

Those are not duplicate entries. They all lead to unique content.

The entry for 2005 reads:

  • Volume No. 5 – Proceedings of the 38th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS’05) – Track 5
  • Volume No. 7 – Proceedings of the 38th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS’05) – Track 7
  • Volume No. 3 – Proceedings of the 38th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS’05) – Track 3
  • Volume No. 6 – Proceedings of the 38th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS’05) – Track 6
  • Volume No. 9 – Proceedings of the 38th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS’05) – Track 9
  • Volume No. 2 – Proceedings of the 38th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS’05) – Track 2
  • Volume No. 1 – Proceedings of the 38th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS’05) – Track 1
  • Volume No. 8 – Proceedings of the 38th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS’05) – Track 8
  • Volume No. 4 – Proceedings of the 38th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS’05) – Track 4

Now that’s a much more useful listing. 😉

Don’t despair! That changed in 2009 and in the latest (2011), we find:

  • 2011 44th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences

OK, so we follow that link to find (in part):

  • David J. Nickles, Daniel D. Suthers, “A Study of Structured Lecture Podcasting to Facilitate Active Learning,” hicss, pp.1-10, 2011 44th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, 2011
  • J. Lucca, R. Sharda, J. Ruffner, U. Shimp, D. Biros, A. Clower, “Ammunition Multimedia Encyclopedia (AME): A Case Study,” hicss, pp.1-10, 2011 44th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, 2011
  • (emphasis added)

Do you notice anything odd about the pagination numbers?

Just for grins, 2008, all the articles are one page long – pp 28, pp 29.

BTW, all the articles appear (I haven’t verified this) to have unique DOI entries.

I am deeply interested in the topics covered by HICSS, so if I organize the proceeding into a more useful form, how do I make that extensible by other researchers?

That is I have no interest in duplicating the work already done for these listings but rather adding value to them and at the same time, being open to more value being added to my work product.

Here are some observations to start a requirements process.

The pages with the HTML abstracts of the articles have helpful links (such as more articles by the same author and co-authors). Could duplicate the author/co-author links but why? Additional maintenance duty.

Conferences should have a one page display, 1995 to current year, with each conference expanding into tracks and each track into papers (with authors listed). Mostly for browsing purposes.

Should be searchable across these proceedings only. (A feature apparently not available at the CS Digital Library site.)

Search should include title, author, exact phrase (as CS Digital Library does) but also subjects.

What am I missing? (Lots I know so be gentle. 😉 )

BTW, be aware of: HICSS Symposium and Workshop Reports and Monographs (also free for downloading)

Knowledge Economics II

Sunday, March 18th, 2012

My notes about Steve Newcomb’s economic asset approach to knowledge/information integration were taking me too far afield from the conference proper.

As an economic asset, take information liberated from alphabet soup agency (ASP) #1 to be integrated with your information. Your information could be from unnamed sources, public records, your records, etc. Reliable integration requires semantic knowledge of ASP #1’s records or trial-n-error processing. Unless, of course, you have a mapping enabling reliable integration of ASP #1 information with your own.

How much is that “mapping” worth to you? Is it reusable? Or should I say, “retargetable?”

You can, as people are want to do, hire a data mining firm to go over thousands of documents (like State Department cables, which revealed the trivia nature of State Department secrets) and get a one off result. But what happens the next time? Do you do the same thing over again? And how does that fit into your prior results?

That’s really the question isn’t it? Not how do you process the current batch of information (although that can be important) but how does that integrate into your prior data? So that your current reporters will not have to duplicate all the searching your earlier reporters did to find the same information.

Perhaps they will uncover relationships that were not apparent from only one batch of leaked information. Perhaps they will purchase from the airlines their travel data to be integrated with reported sightings from their own sources. Or telephone records from carriers not based in the United States.

But data integration opportunities are not just for governments and the press.

Your organization has lots of information. Information on customers. Information on suppliers. Information on your competition. Information on what patients were taking what drugs with what results? (Would you give that information to drug companies or sell it to drug companies? I know my answer. How about yours?)

What will you answer when a shareholder asks: What is our KROI? Knowledge Return on Investment?

You have knowledge to sell. How are you going to package it up to attract buyers? (inquiries welcome)

Knowledge Economics (Grand Wailea Maui, HI 2013)

Sunday, March 18th, 2012

KE HICSS 2013 : Knowledge Economics: HICSS-46 (2013)

When Jan 7, 2013 – Jan 10, 2013
Where Grand Wailea Maui, HI
Submission Deadline Jun 15, 2012
Notification Due Aug 15, 2012
Final Version Due Sep 15, 2012

A conference running to catch up with Steve Newcomb’s advocacy of knowledge integration mappings as economic assets. (See Knowledge Economics II)

Additional details about the Minitrack may be found at: http://www.hicss.hawaii.edu/hicss_46/KMEconomics.pdf

Join our “Knowledge Economics” LinkedIn group: http://www.linkedin.com/groups/Knowledge-Economics-4351854?trk=myg_ugrp_ovr

Knowledge Management is continuously gaining importance in research and practice, since economically growth economies are more reliant on the contribution of knowledge intensive businesses. Various methodologies to identify, capture, model and simulate knowledge transfers have been elaborated within the business scope. These methodologies comprise both the technical, as well as the organizational aspect of knowledge, being transferred in organizations.

This minitrack aims to provide insight on the knowledge economics and emphasizes a holistic view on the economic implications of knowledge, including the value and economics of repositories and the overall value of knowledge. Further on, implications of the knowledge society and knowledge based policy are covered within the scope of this minitrack.

Possible contributions regarding the economics of knowledge management and transfer may include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Value and economics of repositories
  • Implications of the knowledge society
  • Policy generation and implementation in the knowledge society
  • Knowledge based theory
  • Knowledge based society
  • Economics of knowledge co-creation and Business Process Management (BPM)
  • Costs associated with knowledge management and knowledge transfer
  • Tangible and intangible (business) value of knowledge management systems
  • Methods for measuring the costs and benefits of projects involving knowledge management systems
  • Measuring, managing and promoting intellectual capital
  • Economics of inner and cross-organizational knowledge transfer
  • Business models involving knowledge management and knowledge transfer
  • The role of human, intellectual and social capital in knowledge management and knowledge transfer
  • Economics of knowledge transfer across developed and emerging economies
  • Value creation through education based knowledge transfer
  • Benefits and costs of considering knowledge in the analysis of business processes
  • Economics of sustainable knowledge management – potentials, barriers and critical success factors
  • Motivations and financial expectations of cross-border knowledge transfer
  • Contribution of knowledge management systems to firm performance and competiveness
  • Economics of talent management
  • Financial effects of the Chief Knowledge Officer (CKO) position, knowledge managers, and other knowledge management related resources
  • Financial rewards systems related to knowledge management and knowledge transfer
  • Frameworks, models and theories related to the economics of knowledge management and transfer

Both conceptual and empirical papers with a sound research background are welcomed. All submissions must include a separate contribution section, explaining how the work contributes to a better understanding of knowledge management and economics.