Archive for the ‘Temporal Semantic Analysis’ Category

Time Curves

Friday, October 30th, 2015

Time Curves by Benjamin Bach, Conglei Shi, Nicolas Heulot, Tara Madhyastha, Tom Grabowski, Pierre Dragicevic.

From What are time curves?:

Time curves are a general approach to visualize patterns of evolution in temporal data, such as:

  • Progression and stagantion,
  • sudden changes,
  • regularity and irregularity,
  • reversals to previous states,
  • temporal states and transitions,
  • reversals to previous states,
  • etc..

Time curves are based on the metaphor of folding a timeline visualization into itself so as to bring similar time points close to each other. This metaphor can be applied to any dataset where a similarity metric between temporal snapshots can be defined, thus it is largely datatype-agnostic. We illustrate how time curves can visually reveal informative patterns in a range of different datasets.

A website to accompany:

Time Curves: Folding Time to Visualize Patterns of Temporal Evolution in Data

Abstract:

We introduce time curves as a general approach for visualizing patterns of evolution in temporal data. Examples of such patterns include slow and regular progressions, large sudden changes, and reversals to previous states. These patterns can be of interest in a range of domains, such as collaborative document editing, dynamic network analysis, and video analysis. Time curves employ the metaphor of folding a timeline visualization into itself so as to bring similar time points close to each other. This metaphor can be applied to any dataset where a similarity metric between temporal snapshots can be defined, thus it is largely datatype-agnostic. We illustrate how time curves can visually reveal informative patterns in a range of different datasets.

From the introduction:


The time curve technique is a generic approach for visualizing temporal data based on self-similarity. It only assumes that the underlying information artefact can be broken down into discrete time points, and that the similarity between any two time points can be quantified through a meaningful metric. For example, a Wikipedia article can be broken down into revisions, and the edit distance can be used to quantify the similarity between any two revisions. A time curve can be seen as a timeline that has been folded into itself to reflect self-similarity (see Figure 1(a)). On the initial timeline, each dot is a time point, and position encodes time. The timeline is then stretched and folded into itself so that similar time points are brought close to each other (bottom). Quantitative temporal information is discarded as spacing now reflects similarity, but the temporal ordering is preserved.

Figure 1(a) also appears on the webpage as:

benjamin-bach01

Obviously a great visualization tool for temporal data but the treatment of self-similarity is greatly encouraging:

that the similarity between any two time points can be quantified through a meaningful metric.

Time curves don’t dictate to users what “meaningful metric” to use for similarity.

BTW, as a bonus, you can upload your data (JSON format) to generate time curves from your own data.

Users/analysts of temporal data need to take a long look at time curves. A very long look.

I first saw this in a tweet by Moritz Stefaner.

Exploiting Discourse Analysis…

Wednesday, October 16th, 2013

Exploiting Discourse Analysis for Article-Wide Temporal Classification by Jun-Ping Ng, Min-Yen Kan, Ziheng Lin, Wei Feng, Bin Chen, Jian Su, Chew-Lim Tan.

Abstract:

In this paper we classify the temporal relations between pairs of events on an article-wide basis. This is in contrast to much of the existing literature which focuses on just event pairs which are found within the same or adjacent sentences. To achieve this, we leverage on discourse analysis as we believe that it provides more useful semantic information than typical lexico-syntactic features. We propose the use of several discourse analysis frameworks, including 1) Rhetorical Structure Theory (RST), 2) PDTB-styled discourse relations, and 3) topical text segmentation. We explain how features derived from these frameworks can be effectively used with support vector machines (SVM) paired with convolution kernels. Experiments show that our proposal is effective in improving on the state-of-the-art significantly by as much as 16% in terms of F1, even if we only adopt less-than-perfect automatic discourse analyzers and parsers. Making use of more accurate discourse analysis can further boost gains to 35%

Cutting edge of discourse analysis, which should be interesting if you are automatically populating topic maps based upon textual analysis.

It won’t be perfect, but even human editors are not perfect. (Or so rumor has it.)

A robust topic map system should accept, track and if approved, apply user submitted corrections and changes.

New Challenges in Distributed Information Filtering and Retrieval

Sunday, September 11th, 2011

New Challenges in Distributed Information Filtering and Retrieval

Proceedings of the 5th International Workshop on New Challenges in Distributed Information Filtering and Retrieval
Palermo, Italy, September 17, 2011.

Edited by:

Cristian Lai – CRS4, Loc. Piscina Manna, Building 1 – 09010 Pula (CA), Italy

Giovanni Semeraro – Dept. of Computer Science, University of Bari, Aldo Moro, Via E. Orabona, 4, 70125 Bari, Italy

Eloisa Vargiu – Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Cagliari, Piazza d’Armi, 09123 Cagliari, Italy

Table of Contents:

  1. Experimenting Text Summarization on Multimodal Aggregation
    Giuliano Armano, Alessandro Giuliani, Alberto Messina, Maurizio Montagnuolo, Eloisa Vargiu
  2. From Tags to Emotions: Ontology-driven Sentimental Analysis in the Social Semantic Web
    Matteo Baldoni, Cristina Baroglio, Viviana Patti, Paolo Rena
  3. A Multi-Agent Decision Support System for Dynamic Supply Chain Organization
    Luca Greco, Liliana Lo Presti, Agnese Augello, Giuseppe Lo Re, Marco La Cascia, Salvatore Gaglio
  4. A Formalism for Temporal Annotation and Reasoning of Complex Events in Natural Language
    Francesco Mele, Antonio Sorgente
  5. Interaction Mining: the new Frontier of Call Center Analytics
    Vincenzo Pallotta, Rodolfo Delmonte, Lammert Vrieling, David Walker
  6. Context-Aware Recommender Systems: A Comparison Of Three Approaches
    Umberto Panniello, Michele Gorgoglione
  7. A Multi-Agent System for Information Semantic Sharing
    Agostino Poggi, Michele Tomaiuolo
  8. Temporal characterization of the requests to Wikipedia
    Antonio J. Reinoso, Jesus M. Gonzalez-Barahona, Rocio Muñoz-Mansilla, Israel Herraiz
  9. From Logical Forms to SPARQL Query with GETARUN
    Rocco Tripodi, Rodolfo Delmonte
  10. ImageHunter: a Novel Tool for Relevance Feedback in Content Based Image Retrieval
    Roberto Tronci, Gabriele Murgia, Maurizio Pili, Luca Piras, Giorgio Giacinto

A word at a time: computing word relatedness using temporal semantic analysis

Friday, April 1st, 2011

A word at a time: computing word relatedness using temporal semantic analysis by Kira Radinsky, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel; Eugene Agichtein, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA; Evgeniy Gabrilovich, Yahoo! Research, Santa Clara, CA, USA; Shaul Markovitch, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel.

Computing the degree of semantic relatedness of words is a key functionality of many language applications such as search, clustering, and disambiguation. Previous approaches to computing semantic relatedness mostly used static language resources, while essentially ignoring their temporal aspects. We believe that a considerable amount of relatedness information can also be found in studying patterns of word usage over time. Consider, for instance, a newspaper archive spanning many years. Two words such as “war” and “peace” might rarely co-occur in the same articles, yet their patterns of use over time might be similar. In this paper, we propose a new semantic relatedness model, Temporal Semantic Analysis (TSA), which captures this temporal information. The previous state of the art method, Explicit Semantic Analysis (ESA), represented word semantics as a vector of concepts. TSA uses a more refined representation, where each concept is no longer scalar, but is instead represented as time series over a corpus of temporally-ordered documents. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to incorporate temporal evidence into models of semantic relatedness. Empirical evaluation shows that TSA provides consistent improvements over the state of the art ESA results on multiple benchmarks.

The discovery of “related” terms may lead to discovery of synonyms for a subject, associations with a subject and other grist for your topic map mill.

This is interesting work and should be considered whenever topic mapping material recorded over time. Historical government archives come to mind.