Archive for the ‘Ancient World’ Category

Unicode Egyptian Hieroglyphic Fonts

Monday, October 16th, 2017

Unicode Egyptian Hieroglyphic Fonts by Bob Richmond.

From the webpage:

These fonts all contain the Unicode 5.2 (2009) basic set of Egyptian Hieroglyphs.

Please contact me if you know of any others, or information to include.

Also of interest:

UMdC Coding Manual for Egyptian Hieroglyphic in Unicode

UMdC (Unicode MdC) aims to provides guidelines for encoding Egyptian Hieroglyphic and related scripts In Unicode using plain text with optional lightweight mark-up.

This GitHub project is the central point for development of UMdC and associated resources. Features of UMdC are still in a discussion phase so everything here should be regarded as preliminary and subject to change. As such the project is initially oriented towards expert Egyptologists and software developers who wish to help ensure ancient Egyptian writing system is well supported in modern digital media.

The Manuel de Codage (MdC) system for digital encoding of Ancient Egyptian textual data was adopted as an informal standard in the 1980s and has formed the basis for most subsequent digital encodings, sometimes using extensions or revisions to the original scheme. UMdC links to the traditional methodology in various ways to help with the transition to Unicode-based solutions.

As with the original MdC system, UMdC data files (.umdc) can be viewed and edited in standard text editors (such as Windows Notepad) and the HTML <textarea></textarea> control. Specialist software applications can be adapted or developed to provide a simpler workflow or enable additional techniques for working with the material.

Also see UMdC overview [pdf].

A UMdC-compatible hieroglyphic font Aaron UMdC Alpha (relative to the current draft) can be downloaded from the Hieroglyphs Everywhere Fonts project.

For news and information on Ancient Egyptian in Unicode see https://hieroglyphseverywhere.blogspot.co.uk/.

I understand the need for “plain text” viewing of hieroglyphics, especially for primers and possibly for search engines, but Egyptian hieroglyphs can be written facing right or left, top to bottom and more rarely bottom to top. Moreover, artistic and other considerations can result in transposition of glyphs out of their “linear” order in a Western reading sense.

Unicode hieroglyphs are a major step forward for the interchange of hieroglyphic texts but we should remain mindful “linear” presentation of inscription texts is a far cry from their originals.

The greater our capacity for graphic representation, the more we simplify complex representations from the past. Are the needs of our computers really that important?

Linked Ancient World Data Institute

Thursday, January 19th, 2012

Linked Ancient World Data Institute

From the webpage:

Applications due February 17

New York University’s Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (ISAW) will host the Linked Ancient World Data Institute (LAWDI) from May 31st to June 2nd, 2012 in New York City. “Linked Open Data” is an approach to the creation of digital resources that emphasizes connections between diverse information on the basis of published and stable web addresses (URIs) that identify common concepts and individual items. LAWDI, funded by the Office of Digital Humanities of the National Endowment for Humanities, will bring together an international faculty of practitioners working in the field of Linked Data with twenty attendees who are implementing or planning the creation of digital resources.

LAWDI’s intellectual scope is the Ancient Mediterranean and Ancient Near East, two fields in which a large and increasing number of digital resources is available, with rich coverage of the archaeology, literature and history of these regions. Many of these resources publish stable URIs for their content and so are enabling links and re-use that create a varied research and publication environment. LAWDI attendees will learn how to take advantage of these resources and also how to contribute to the growing network of linked scholarly materials.

The organizers encourage applications from faculty, university staff, graduate students, librarians, museum professionals, archivists and others with a serious interest in creating digital resources for the study of the Ancient World. Applications to attend should take the form of an attached (MS-Word, PDF or other common format) one-page statement of interest e-mailed to <sebastian.heath@nyu.edu> by Friday, February 17. A discussion of current or planned work should be a prominent part of this statement. As part of the curriculum, successful applicants will be asked to present their work and be ready to actively participate in conversations about topics presented by faculty and the other participants.

The announcement for LAWDI is here and the organizers are grateful for any circulation of this information.

A second session of LAWDI will also take place from May 30 to June 1 of 2013 at Drew University in New Jersey (http://drew.edu).

If you know of anyone who would be interested, please forward them a link to this post.