Archive for the ‘Forth’ Category

Low fat computing

Thursday, December 22nd, 2016

Low fat computing by Karsten Schmidt

A summary of the presentation by Schmidt by Malcolm Sparks, along with the presentation itself.

Lots of strange and 3-D printable eye candy for the first 15 minutes or so with Schmidt’s background. Starts to really rock around 20 minutes in with Forth code and very low level coding.

To get a better idea of what Schmidt has been doing, see his website: thi.ng, or his Forth repl in Javascript, http://forth.thi.ng/, or his GitHub repository or at: Github: thi.ng

Stop by at http://toxiclibs.org/ although the material there looks dated.

FORTH For A Supercomputer

Monday, June 15th, 2015

Raspberry Pi JonesFORTH O/S

From the post:

A bare-metal operating system for Raspberry Pi, based on Jonesforth-ARM.

Jonesforth-ARM is an ARM port, by M2IHP’13 class members listed in AUTHORS, of x86 JonesForth.

x86 JonesForth is a Linux-hosted FORTH presented in a Literate Programming style by Richard W.M. Jones rich@annexia.org originally at http://annexia.org/forth. Comments embedded in the original provide an excellent FORTH implementation tutorial. See the /annexia/ directory for a copy of this original source.

The algorithm for our unsigned DIVMOD instruction is extracted from ‘ARM Software Development Toolkit User Guide v2.50’ published by ARM in 1997-1998

Firmware files to make bootable images are maintained at https://github.com/raspberrypi/firmware. See the /firmware/ directory for local copies used in the build process.

The Raspberry Pi or something very similar will be commonplace in the IoT.

Will those machines be doing your bidding or someone else’s?

Thinking Forth Project

Thursday, August 18th, 2011

Thinking Forth Project

From the webpage:

Thinking Forth is a book about the philosophy of problem solving and programming style, applied to the unique programming language Forth. Published first in 1984, it could be among the timeless classics of computer books, such as Fred Brooks’ The Mythical Man-Month and Donald Knuth’s The Art of Computer Programming.

Many software engineering principles discussed here have been rediscovered in eXtreme Programming, including (re)factoring, modularity, bottom-up and incremental design. Here you’ll find all of those and more – such as the value of analysis and design – described in Leo Brodie’s down-to-earth, humorous style, with illustrations, code examples, practical real life applications, illustrative cartoons, and interviews with Forth’s inventor, Charles H. Moore as well as other Forth thinkers.

If you program in Forth, this is a must-read book. If you don’t, the fundamental concepts are universal: Thinking Forth is meant for anyone interested in writing software to solve problems. The concepts go beyond Forth, but the simple beauty of Forth throws those concepts into stark relief.

So flip open the book, and read all about the philosophy of Forth, analysis, decomposition, problem solving, style and conventions, factoring, handling data, and minimizing control structures. But be prepared: you may not be able to put it down.

PDF version of “Thinking Forth” available for free. Not to mention a revision project.

Many of the techniques in this book apply to data analysis/topic map design as well.