98% Fail Rate on Privileged Accounts – Transparency in 2018

Half of companies fail to tell customers about data breaches, claims study by Nicholas Fearn.

From the post:

Half of organisations don’t bother telling customers when their personal information might have been compromised following a cyber attack, according to a new study.

The latest survey from security firm CyberArk comes with the full implementation of the European Union General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) just months away.

Organisations that fail to notify the relevant data protection authorities of a breach within 72 hours of finding it can expect to face crippling fines of up to four per cent of turnover – with companies trying to hide breaches likely to be hit with the biggest punishments.

The findings have been published in the second iteration the CyberArk Global Advanced Threat Landscape Report 2018, which explores business leaders’ attitudes towards IT security and data protection.

The survey found that, overall, security “does not translate into accountability”. Some 46 per cent of organisations struggle to stop every attempt to breach their IT infrastructure.

And 63 per cent of business leaders acknowledge that their companies are vulnerable to attacks, such as phishing. Despite this concern, 49 per cent of organisations don’t have the right knowledge about security policies.

You can download the report cited in Fearn’s post at: Cyberark Global Advanced Threat Landscape Report 2018: The Business View of Security.

If you think that report has implications for involuntary/inadvertent transparency, Cyberark Global Advanced Threat Landscape Report 2018: Focus on DevOps, reports this gem:


It’s not just that businesses underestimate threats. As noted above, they also do not seem to fully understand where privileged accounts and secrets exist. When asked which IT environments and devices contain privileged accounts and secrets, responses (IT decision maker and DevOps/app developer respondents) were at odds with the claim that most businesses have implemented a privileged account security solution. A massive 98% did not select at least one of the ‘containers’, ‘microservices’, ‘CI/CD tools’, ‘cloud environments’ or ‘source code repositories’ options. At the risk of repetition, privileged accounts and secrets are stored in all of these entities.

A fail rate of 98% on identifying “privileged accounts and secrets?”

Reports like this make you wonder about the clamor for transparency of organizations and governments. Why bother?

Information in 2018 is kept secure by a lack of interest in collecting it.

Remember that for your next transparency discussion.

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