Who Prefers Zero Days over 7 Year Old Bugs? + Legalization of Hacking

“Who” is not clear but Dan Goodin reports in Windows bug used to spread Stuxnet remains world’s most exploited that:

One of the Microsoft Windows vulnerabilities used to spread the Stuxnet worm that targeted Iran remained the most widely exploited software bug in 2015 and 2016 even though the bug was patched years earlier, according to a report published by antivirus provider Kaspersky Lab.

In 2015, 27 percent of Kaspersky users who encountered any sort of exploit were exposed to attacks targeting the critical Windows flaw indexed as CVE-2010-2568. In 2016, the figure dipped to 24.7 percent but still ranked the highest. The code-execution vulnerability is triggered by plugging a booby-trapped USB drive into a vulnerable computer. The second most widespread exploit was designed to gain root access rights to Android phones, with 11 percent in 2015 and 15.6 percent last year.

A market share of almost 25%, despite being patched in 2010, marks CVE-2010-2568 as one of the top bugs a hacker should have in their toolkit.

Not to denigrate finding zero day flaws in vibrators and other IoT devices, or more exotic potential exploits in the Linux kernel but if you approach hacking as an investment, the “best” tools aren’t always the most recent ones. (“Best” defined as the highest return for mastery and use.)

Looking forward to the legalization of hacking, unauthorized penetration of information systems, with civil and criminal penalties for owners of those systems who get hacked.

I suggest that because hacking being illegal, has done nothing to stem the tide of hacking. Mostly because threatening people you can’t find or who think they won’t be found, is by definition, ineffectual.

Making hacking legal and penalizing business interests who get hacked, is a threat against people you can find on a regular basis. They pay taxes, register their stocks, market their products.

Speaking of paying taxes, there could be an OS upgrade tax credit. Something to nudge all the Windows XP, Vista, 7 instances out of existence. That alone would be the largest single improvement in cybersecurity since that because a term.

Legalized, hackers would provide a continuing incentive (fines and penalties) for better software and more consistent upgrade practices. Take advantage of that large pool of unpaid but enthusiastic labor (hackers).

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