The New Handbook For Cyberwar Is Being Written By Russia

The New Handbook For Cyberwar Is Being Written By Russia by Sheera Frenkel.

From the post:


One US intelligence officer currently involved in cyber ops said, “It’s not that the Russians are doing something others can’t do. It’s not as though, say, the US wouldn’t have the technical skill level to carry out those types of attacks. It’s that Russian hackers are willing to go there, to experiment and carry out attacks that other countries would back away from,” said the officer, who asked not to be quoted by name due to the sensitivity of the subject. “It’s audacious, and reckless. They are testing things out in the field and refining them, and a lot of it is very, very messy and some is very smart.”

Well, “…testing things out in the field and refining them…” is the difference between a potential weapon on a dry erase board and a working weapon in practice. Yes?

Personally I favor the working weapon in practice.

It’s an interesting read despite the repetition of the now debunked claim of Wikileaks releasing 8,761 CIA documents (Fact Checking Wikileaks’ Vault 7: CIA Hacking Tools Revealed (Part 1))

Frenkel of course covers the DNC hack:


The hack on the DNC, which US intelligence agencies have widely attributed to Russia, could be replicated by dozens of countries around the world, according to Robert Knake, a former director of cybersecurity policy in the Obama administration.

“Russia has laid out the playbook. What Russia did was relatively unsophisticated and something that probably about 60 countries around the world have the capability of doing — which is to target third parties, to steal documents and emails, and to selectively release them to create unfavorable conditions for that party,” Knake told the BBC’s Today. “It’s unsubtle interference. And it’s a violation of national sovereignty and customary law.”

Kanke reflects the failure of major powers to understand the leveling potential of cyberwarfare. Sixty countries? You think? How about every kid that can run a phishing scam to steal John Podesta’s password? How many? 600,000 maybe? More than that?

None of who care about “…national sovereignty and customary law.”

Are you going to write or be described in a chapter of the new book on cyberwar?

Your call.

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