Fact Checking Wikileaks’ Vault 7: CIA Hacking Tools Revealed (Part 2 – The PDF Files)

You may want to read Fact Checking Wikileaks’ Vault 7: CIA Hacking Tools Revealed (Part 1) before reading this post. In Part 1, I walk you through obtaining a copy of Wikileaks’ Vault 7: CIA Hacking Tools Revealed so you can follow and check my analysis and conclusions.

Fact checking applies to every source, including this blog.

I proofed my listing of the 357 PDF files in the first Vault 7 release and report an increase in arguably CIA files and a slight decline in public documents. An increase from 114 to 125 for the CIA and a decrease from 109 to 98 for public documents.

  1. Arguably CIA – 125
  2. Public – 98
  3. Wikileaks placeholders – 134

The listings to date:

  1. CIA (maybe)
  2. Public documents
  3. Wikileaks placeholders

For public documents, I created hyperlinks whenever possible. (Saying a fact and having evidence are two different things.) Vendor documentation that was not marked with a security classification I counted as public.

All I can say for the Wikileaks placeholders, some 134 of them, is to ignore them unless you like mining low grade ore.

I created notes in the CIA listing to help narrow your focus down to highly relevant materials.

I have more commentary in the works but I wanted to release these listings in case they help others make efficient use of their time.

Enjoy!

PS: A question I want to start addressing this week is how the dilution of a leak impacts the use of same?

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