Learning R programming by reading books: A book list

Learning R programming by reading books: A book list by Liang-Cheng Zhang.

From the post:

Despite R’s popularity, it is still very daunting to learn R as R has no click-and-point feature like SPSS and learning R usually takes lots of time. No worries! As self-R learner like us, we constantly receive the requests about how to learn R. Besides hiring someone to teach you or paying tuition fees for online courses, our suggestion is that you can also pick up some books that fit your current R programming level. Therefore, in this post, we would like to share some good books that teach you how to learn programming in R based on three levels: elementary, intermediate, and advanced levels. Each level focuses on one task so you will know whether these books fit your needs. While the following books do not necessarily focus on the task we define, you should focus the task when you reading these books so you are not lost in contexts.

Books and reading form the core of my most basic prejudice: Literacy is the doorway to unlimited universes.

A prejudice so strong that I have to work hard at realizing non-literates live in and sense worlds not open to literates. Not less complex, not poorer, just different.

But book lists in particular appeal to that prejudice and since my blog is read by literates, I’m indulging that prejudice now.

I do have a title to add to the list: Practical Data Science with R by Nina Zumel and John Mount.

Judging from the other titles listed, Practical Data Science with R falls in the intermediate range. Should not be your first R book but certainly high on the list for your second R book.

Avoid the rush! Start working on your Amazon wish list today! 😉

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