PubMed comments & their continuing conversations

PubMed comments & their continuing conversations

From the post:

We have many options for communication. We can choose platforms that fit our style, approach, and time constraints. From pop culture to current events, information and opinions are shared and discussed across multiple channels. And scientific publications are no exception.

PubMed Commons was established to enable commenting in PubMed, the largest biomedical literature database. In the past year, commenters posted to more than 1,400 publications. Of those publications, 80% have a single comment today, and 12% have comments from multiple members. The conversation carries forward in other venues.

Sometimes comments pull in discussion from other locations or spark exchanges elsewhere.Here are a few examples where social media prompted PubMed Commons posts or continued the commentary on publications.

An encouraging review of examples of sane discussion through the use of comments.

Unlike the abandoning of comments by some media outlets, NPR for example, NPR Website To Get Rid Of Comments by Elizabeth Jensen.

My take away from Jensen’s account was that NPR likes its free speech, not so much interested in the free speech of others.

See also: Have Comment Sections on News Media Websites Failed?, for op-ed pieces at the New York Times from a variety of perspectives.

Perhaps comments on news sites are examples of casting pearls before swine? (Matthew 7:6)

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