Deep Learning Trends @ ICLR 2016 (+ Shout-Out to arXiv)

Deep Learning Trends @ ICLR 2016 by Tomasz Malisiewicz.

From the post:

Started by the youngest members of the Deep Learning Mafia [1], namely Yann LeCun and Yoshua Bengio, the ICLR conference is quickly becoming a strong contender for the single most important venue in the Deep Learning space. More intimate than NIPS and less benchmark-driven than CVPR, the world of ICLR is arXiv-based and moves fast.

Today’s post is all about ICLR 2016. I’ll highlight new strategies for building deeper and more powerful neural networks, ideas for compressing big networks into smaller ones, as well as techniques for building “deep learning calculators.” A host of new artificial intelligence problems is being hit hard with the newest wave of deep learning techniques, and from a computer vision point of view, there’s no doubt that deep convolutional neural networks are today’s “master algorithm” for dealing with perceptual data.

Information packed review of the conference and if that weren’t enough, this shout-out to arXiv:


ICLR Publishing Model: arXiv or bust
At ICLR, papers get posted on arXiv directly. And if you had any doubts that arXiv is just about the single awesomest thing to hit the research publication model since the Gutenberg press, let the success of ICLR be one more data point towards enlightenment. ICLR has essentially bypassed the old-fashioned publishing model where some third party like Elsevier says “you can publish with us and we’ll put our logo on your papers and then charge regular people $30 for each paper they want to read.” Sorry Elsevier, research doesn’t work that way. Most research papers aren’t good enough to be worth $30 for a copy. It is the entire body of academic research that provides true value, for which a single paper just a mere door. You see, Elsevier, if you actually gave the world an exceptional research paper search engine, together with the ability to have 10-20 papers printed on decent quality paper for a $30/month subscription, then you would make a killing on researchers and I would endorse such a subscription. So ICLR, rightfully so, just said fuck it, we’ll use arXiv as the method for disseminating our ideas. All future research conferences should use arXiv to disseminate papers. Anybody can download the papers, see when newer versions with corrections are posted, and they can print their own physical copies. But be warned: Deep Learning moves so fast, that you’ve gotta be hitting refresh or arXiv on a weekly basis or you’ll be schooled by some grad students in Canada.

Is your publishing < arXiv?

Do you hit arXiv every week?

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