MrGeo (MapReduce Geo)

MrGeo (MapReduce Geo)

From the webpage:

MrGeo was developed at the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) in collaboration with DigitalGlobe. The government has “unlimited rights” and is releasing this software to increase the impact of government investments by providing developers with the opportunity to take things in new directions. The software use, modification, and distribution rights are stipulated within the Apache 2.0 license.

MrGeo (MapReduce Geo) is a geospatial toolkit designed to provide raster-based geospatial capabilities that can be performed at scale. MrGeo is built upon the Hadoop ecosystem to leverage the storage and processing of hundreds of commodity computers. Functionally, MrGeo stores large raster datasets as a collection of individual tiles stored in Hadoop to enable large-scale data and analytic services. The co-location of data and analytics offers the advantage of minimizing the movement of data in favor of bringing the computation to the data; a more favorable compute method for Geospatial Big Data. This framework has enabled the servicing of terabyte scale raster databases and performed terrain analytics on databases exceeding hundreds of gigabytes in size.

The use cases sound interesting:

Exemplar MrGeo Use Cases:

  • Raster Storage and Provisioning: MrGeo has been used to store, index, tile, and pyramid multi-terabyte scale image databases. Once stored, this data is made available through simple Tiled Map Services (TMS) and or Web Mapping Services (WMS).
  • Large Scale Batch Processing and Serving: MrGeo has been used to pre-compute global 1 ArcSecond (nominally 30 meters) elevation data (300+ GB) into derivative raster products : slope, aspect, relative elevation, terrain shaded relief (collectively terabytes in size)
  • Global Computation of Cost Distance: Given all pub locations in OpenStreetMap, compute 2 hour drive times from each location. The full resolution is 1 ArcSecond (30 meters nominally)
  • I wonder if you started war gaming attacks on well known cities and posting maps on how the attacks could develop if that would be covered under free speech? Assuming your intent was to educate the general populace about areas that are more dangerous than others in case of a major incident.

    I first saw this in a tweet by Marin Dimitrov.

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