Software Foundations

Software Foundations by Benjamin Pierce and others.

From the preface:

This electronic book is a course on Software Foundations, the mathematical underpinnings of reliable software. Topics include basic concepts of logic, computer-assisted theorem proving and the Coq proof assistant, functional programming, operational semantics, Hoare logic, and static type systems. The exposition is intended for a broad range of readers, from advanced undergraduates to PhD students and researchers. No specific background in logic or programming languages is assumed, though a degree of mathematical maturity will be helpful.

One novelty of the course is that it is one hundred per cent formalized and machine-checked: the entire text is literally a script for Coq. It is intended to be read alongside an interactive session with Coq. All the details in the text are fully formalized in Coq, and the exercises are designed to be worked using Coq.

The files are organized into a sequence of core chapters, covering about one semester’s worth of material and organized into a coherent linear narrative, plus a number of “appendices” covering additional topics. All the core chapters are suitable for both graduate and upper-level undergraduate students.

This looks like a real treat!

Imagine security in a world where buggy software (by error and design) wasn’t patched by more buggy software (by error and design) and protected by security software, which is also buggy (by error and design). Would that change the complexion of current security issues?

I first saw this in a tweet by onepaperperday.

PS: Sony got hacked, again. Rumor is that this latest Sony hack was an extra credit exercise for a 6th grade programming class.

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