Everything You Need To Know About Social Media Search

Everything You Need To Know About Social Media Search by Olsy Sorokina.

From the post:

For the past decade, social networks have been the most universally consistent way for us to document our lives. We travel, build relationships, accomplish new goals, discuss current events and welcome new lives—and all of these events can be traced on social media. We have created hashtags like #ThrowbackThursday and apps like Timehop to reminisce on all the past moments forever etched in the social web in form of status updates, photos, and 140-character phrases.

Major networks demonstrate their awareness of the role they play in their users’ lives by creating year-end summaries such as Facebook’s Year in Review, and Twitter’s #YearOnTwitter. However, much of the emphasis on social media has been traditionally placed on real-time interactions, which often made it difficult to browse for past posts without scrolling down for hours on end.

The bias towards real-time messaging has changed in a matter of a few days. Over the past month, three major social networks announced changes to their search functions, which made finding old posts as easy as a Google search. If you missed out on the news or need a refresher, here’s everything you need to know.

I suppose Olsy means in addition to search in general sucking.

Interested tidbit on Facebook:


This isn’t Facebook’s first attempt at building a search engine. The earlier version of Graph Search gave users search results in response to longer-form queries, such as “my friends who like Game of Thrones.” However, the semantic search never made it to the mobile platforms; many supposed that using complex phrases as search queries was too confusing for an average user.

Does anyone have any user research on the ability of users to use complex phrases as search queries?

I ask because if users have difficulty authoring “complex” semantics and difficulty querying with “complex” semantics, it stands to reason they may have difficulty interpreting “complex” semantic results. Yes?

If all three of those are the case, then how do we impart the value-add of “complex” semantics without tripping over one of those limitations?

Osly also covers Instagram and Twitter. Twitter’s advanced search looks like the standard include/exclude, etc. type of “advanced” search. “Advanced” maybe forty years ago in the early OPACs but not really “advanced” now.

Catch up on these new search features. They will provide at least a minimum of grist for your topic map mill.

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