RELEASE

RELEASE A High-Level Paradigm for Reliable Large-Scale Server Software.

From the webpage:

RELEASE is an EU FP7 STREP (287510) project that aims to scale the radical concurrency-oriented programming paradigm to build reliable general-purpose software, such as server-based systems, on massively parallel machines. The trend-setting language we will use is Erlang/OTP which has concurrency and robustness designed in. Currently Erlang/OTP has inherently scalable computation and reliability models, but in practice scalability is constrained by aspects of the language and virtual machine. Moreover existing profiling and debugging tools don’t scale.

I found the project after following a lead to:

The Design of Scalable Distributed Erlang N. Chechina, P. Trinder, A. Ghaffari, R. Green, K. Lundin, and R. Virding. Symposium on Implementation and Application of Functional Languages 2012 (IFL’12), Oxford, UK, 2012 (Submitted).

Abstract:

The multicore revolution means that the number of cores in commodity machines is growing exponentially. Many expect 100,000 core clouds (or platforms) to become commonplace, and the best predictions are that core failures on such an architecture will become relatively common, perhaps one hour mean time between core failures. The RELEASE project aims to scale Erlang to build reliable general-purpose software, such as server-based systems, on massively parallel machines. In this paper we present a design of Scalable Distributed (SD) Erlang — an extension of the Distributed Erlang functional programming language for reliable scalability. The design focuses on three aspects of Erlang scalability: scaling the number of Erlang nodes by eliminating transitive connections and introducing scalable groups (s groups); managing process placement in the scaled networks by introducing semi-explicit process placement; and preserving Erlang reliability model.

You might also want to read Simon St. Laurent’s Distributed resilience with functional programming, an interview with Steve Vinoski.

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