Neo4j’s Cypher internals – Part 2: All clauses, more Scala’s Parser Combinators and query entry point

Neo4j’s Cypher internals – Part 2: All clauses, more Scala’s Parser Combinators and query entry point

From the post:

During the previous post, I’ve explained what is Neo4j and then, explained how graph traversal could be done on Neo4j using the Java API. Next, I’ve introduced Cypher and how it helped write queries, in order to retrieve data from the graph. After introducing Cypher’s syntax, we dissected the Start Clause, which is the start point (duh) for any query being written on Cypher. If you hadn’t read it, go there, and then come back to read this one.

In this second part, I’ll show the other clauses existents in Cypher, the Match, Where, Return, Skip and Limit, OrderBy and Return. Some will be simple, some not and I’ll go in a more detailed way on those clauses that aren’t so trivial. After that, we will take a look at the Cypher query entry point, and how the query parsing is unleashed.

Nuff said, let’s get down to business.

This and part 1 are starting points for understanding Cypher. A key to evaluation of Neo4j as a topic map storage/application platform.

True enough, at present (1.4) Neo4j only supports 32 billion nodes, 32 billion relationships and 64 billion properties per database but on the other hand, I have fewer than 32 billion books than that so at a certain level of coarseness it should be fine. 😉

BTW, I do collect CS texts, old as well as new. Mostly algorithm, parsing, graph, IR, database sort of stuff but occasionally other stuff too. Just in case you have a author’s copy or need to clear out space for more books. Drop me a line if you would like to make a donation to my collection.

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