The EFF, Privilege, Revolution

The Revolution and Slack by Gennie Gebhart and Cindy Cohn.

From the post:

The revolution will not be televised, but it may be hosted on Slack. Community groups, activists, and workers in the United States are increasingly gravitating toward the popular collaboration tool to communicate and coordinate efforts. But many of the people using Slack for political organizing and activism are not fully aware of the ways Slack falls short in serving their security needs. Slack has yet to support this community in its default settings or in its ongoing design.

We urge Slack to recognize the community organizers and activists using its platform and take more steps to protect them. In the meantime, this post provides context and things to consider when choosing a platform for political organizing, as well as some tips about how to set Slack up to best protect your community.

Great security advice for organizers and activists who choose to use Slack.

But let’s be realistic about “revolution.” The EFF, community organizers and activists who would use Slack, are by definition, not revolutionaries.

How else would you explain the pantheon of legal cases pursued by the EFF? When the EFF lost, did it seek remedies by other means? Did it take illegal action to protect/avenge injured innocents?

Privilege is what enables people to say, “I’m using the law to oppose to X,” while other people are suffering the consequences of X.

Privilege holders != revolutionaries.

FYI any potential revolutionaries: If “on the Internet, no one knows your a dog,” it’s also true “no one knows you are a government agent.”

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