Evolving a Decompiler

Evolving a Decompiler by Matt Noonan.

From the post:

Back in 2016, Eric Schulte, Jason Ruchti, myself, Alexey Loginov, and David Ciarletta (all of the research arm of GrammaTech) spent some time diving into a new approach to decompilation. We made some progress but were eventually all pulled away to other projects, leaving a very interesting work-in-progress prototype behind.

Being a promising but incomplete research prototype, it was quite difficult to find a venue to publish our research. But I am very excited to announce that I will be presenting this work at the NDSS binary analysis research (BAR) workshop next week in San Diego, CA! BAR is a workshop on the state-of-the-art in binary analysis research, including talks about working systems as well as novel prototypes and works-in-progress; I’m really happy that the program committee decided to include discussion of these prototypes, because there are a lot of cool ideas out there that aren’t production-ready, but may flourish once the community gets a chance to start tinkering with them.

How wickedly cool!

Did I mention all the major components are open-source?


GrammaTech recently open-sourced all of the major components of BED, including:

  • SEL, the Software Evolution Library. This is a Common Lisp library for program synthesis and repair, and is quite nice to work with interactively. All of the C-specific mutations used in BED are available as part of SEL; the only missing component is the big code database; just bring your own!
  • clang-mutate, a command-line tool for performing low-level mutations on C and C++ code. All of the actual edits are performed using clang-mutate; it also includes a REPL-like interface for interactively manipulating C and C++ code to quickly produce variants.

The building of the “big code database” sounds like an exercise in subject identity doesn’t it?

Topic maps anyone?

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