Data Hoarding Journalists and Information Security

A Study of Technology in Newsrooms

From the post:

We face a global media landscape rife with both uncertainty and excitement. The need to understand this new digital era — and what it means for journalists — has never been more urgent. That’s why we at the International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) launched the first-ever global survey on the adoption of new technologies in news media.

More than 2,700 newsroom managers and journalists, from 130 countries, responded to our survey, which was conducted in 12 languages. Storyful, Google News Lab and SurveyMonkey supported the research. ICFJ worked with Georgetown University’s Communication, Culture, and Technology (CCT) program to administer and analyze the survey, conducted using SurveyMonkey.

One highlight from the report:

Perhaps data hoarding journalists aren’t as secure as they imagine.

Considering they are hoarding stolen data for their own benefit, what would be their complaint if the data was liberated from them?

I’ve heard the “we act in the public interest” argument but unless and until the public can compare the data to their reports, it’s hard to judge such claims.

Notice I said “the public” and not me. There are entire areas of no interest to me or in which I lack the skills to judge the evidence. Interests and skills possessed by other members of the public.

I’m not interested in access to hoarded information until everyone has access to the same information. To exclude anyone from access is to put them at a disadvantage in any ensuing discussion. I’m not willing to go there. Are you?

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