Peeping Toms Jump > 16,000 In UK

The ranks of peeping toms swells by at least 16,000 in the UK:

More than 16,000 staff in the public sector empowered to examine your web browsing by Graeme Burton.

From the post:

More than 16,000 staff in the public sector and its agencies have been empower by Section 4 of the Investigatory Powers Act to snoop on people’s internet connection records.

And that’s before the estimated 4,000 staff at security agency MI5, the 5,500 at GCHQ and 2,500 at MI6 are taken into account.

That’s according to the responses from a series of almost 100 Freedom of Information (FOI) requests made in a bid to find out exactly who has the power to snoop on ordinary people’s web browsing histories under the Act.

GCHQ, the Home Office, MI6, the National Crime Agency, the Ministry of Justice, all three armed forces and Police Service of Scotland all failed to respond to the FOI requests – so the total could be much higher.

My delusion that the UK has a mostly rational government was shattered by passage of the Investigatory Powers Act. Following web browsing activity, hell, even tracking everyone and their conversations, 24 x 7, isn’t going to stop random acts of violence.

What part of random acts of violence being exactly that, random, seems to be unclear? Are there no UK academics to take up the task of proving prediction of random events is possible?

Unless and until the UK Parliament comes to its senses, the best option for avoiding UK peeping toms is to move to another country.

If re-location isn’t possible, use a VPN and a Tor browser for all web activity.

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