Introducing osquery

Introducing osquery by Mike Arpaia.

From the post:

Maintaining real-time insight into the current state of your infrastructure is important. At Facebook, we’ve been working on a framework called osquery which attempts to approach the concept of low-level operating system monitoring a little differently.

Osquery exposes an operating system as a high-performance relational database. This design allows you to write SQL-based queries efficiently and easily to explore operating systems. With osquery, SQL tables represent the current state of operating system attributes, such as:

  • running processes
  • loaded kernel modules
  • open network connections

SQL tables are implemented via an easily extendable API. Several tables already exist and more are being written. To best understand the expressiveness that is afforded to you by osquery, consider the following examples….

I haven’t installed osquery, yet, but suspect that most of the data it collects is available now through a variety of admin tools. But not through a single tool that enables you to query across tables to combine that data. That is the part that intrigues me.

Code and documentation on Github.

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