Twitter4j and Scala

Using twitter4j with Scala to access streaming tweets by Jason Baldridge.

From the introduction:

My previous post provided a walk-through for using the Twitter streaming API from the command line, but tweets can be more flexibly obtained and processed using an API for accessing Twitter using your programming language of choice. In this tutorial, I walk-through basic setup and some simple uses of the twitter4j library with Scala. Much of what I show here should be useful for those using other JVM languages like Clojure and Java. If you haven’t gone through the previous tutorial, have a look now before going on as this tutorial covers much of the same material but using twitter4j rather than HTTP requests.

I’ll introduce code, bit by bit, for accessing the Twitter data in different ways. If you get lost with what should go where, all of the code necessary to run the commands is available in this github gist, so you can compare to that as you move through the tutorial.

Update: The tutorial is set up to take you from nothing to being able to obtain tweets in various ways, but you can also get all the relevant code by looking at the twitter4j-tutorial repository. For this tutorial, the tag is v0.1.0, and you can also download a tarball of that version.

Using Twitter4j with Scala to perform user actions by Jason Baldridge.

From the introduction:

My previous post showed how to use Twitter4j in Scala to access Twitter streams. This post shows how to control a Twitter user’s actions using Twitter4j. The primary purpose of this functionality is perhaps to create interfaces for Twitter like TweetDeck, but it can also be used to create bots that take automated actions on Twitter (one bot I’m playing around with is @tshrdlu, using the code in this tutorial and the code in the tshrdlu repository).

This post will only cover a small portion of the things you can do, but they are some of the more common things and I include a couple of simple but interesting use cases. Once you have these things in place, it is straightforward to figure out how to use the Twitter4j API docs (and Stack Overflow) to do the rest.

Jason continues his tutorial on accessing/processing Twitter streams using Twitter4j and Scala.

Since Twitter has enough status for royal baby names, your data should feel no shame being on Twitter. 😉

Not to mention tweeted IRIs can inform readers of content in excess of one hundred and forty (140) characters in length.

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